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3 



I 





VOLUME LXIII 
PART 2 



MUSEUM 
HISTORY) 





o 3 APii? } 


¥K 


PROCEEDINGS 






of the 

Bournemouth 




Natural Science 




Society 

A Registered Charity No. 219585 




VOLUME LXIII 
PART 2 






(1989-90) 

Edited by 
E. Oldfield 
PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 
AT ITS HOUSE, 
39 CHRISTCHURCH ROAD, 
BOURNEMOUTH BH1 3NS. 




Price: £1.50 

Back numbers of some previous editions of the Proceedings can be 

purchased from the Secretary, price £1.00 each. 
A set of back numbers may be consulted in the Society's Reference 
Library or individual Volumes borrowed from the Lending Library 
on application to the Librarian. 





3 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 



The Society was founded in 1903 for the promotion of 
the study of Science in all its branches by means of 
Lectures, Field Meetings, the Reading and Discussion of 
Papers and in any way that the Council of the Society 
shall deem desi rable . 

An elected Council is charged with the responsibility 
o f managing its affairs in accordance with the rules. 
The Society is a registered Charity No. 219585. 

Sections at present included are: Archaeology and 
History, Astronomy, Botany, Geography, Geology, 
Horticulture, Physics and Chemistry, Photography and 
Zoology (Entomology, Mammalia and Ornithology). 

The Society has its own premises at 39, Christchurch 
Road, a listed building, which provides the venue for 
its lectures and meetings. It houses a museum and a 
library and stands in an interesting, botanical garden. 
Members may borrow books from the library and there is 
a reading room where works of reference may be consulted. 
The museum contains many valuable collections and 
specimens . 

A programme of activities is published quarterly and 
covers most weekdays . The programme comprises lectures, 
field meetings, cultural visits and social events. 

Membership is open to all who are interested in the 
objects of the Society and full details may be obtained 
from the Secretary, 



4 



CONTENTS 

Officers and Council, 1990-91 6 

Committees, 1990-91 7 

List of Members, 31st October, 1990 8 

Obituary Not ices 17 

List of Legacies 17 

Presidential Address:- 
Systems 

by T.P. Whieldon B.Sc 18 

Report of Council v . ... .24 

Report of Tea and Entertainment Committee 28 

Sectional Reports tor the year 1989-90:- 

Archaeology and History 29 

Astronomy 30 

Botany 32 

Geography 34 

Geology 36 

Horticulture 38 

Physics and Chemistry 39 

Photography 39 

Zoology - Entomology 40 

Extracts from the Entomological History of the B.N.S.S.- M.M. Brooks ... 41 

Mammalia and Natural History 45 

Ornithology 49 

Library 52 

Members Day 52 

Museum 53 

Publications and Periodicals Received 54 

List of Presidents 55 



- 5 - 



OFFICERS AND COUNCIL FOR 1990-91 



PRESIDENT: 
T.P. Whieldon B.Sc. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS: 



Miss D.M. Lowther. B.Sc. 
G. Teasdili. F.M.A., F.R.S.A., F.R.N.S.. 
Miss K. Milner Bennetts, F.Z.S. 
S.C.S. Brown. F.D.S., L.D.S.. R.C.S. 
W.H. Lee 

Miss R.H.D. Winter 
J.G. Parkinson, F.Z.S. 
J.C. Mitton 



Miss K. Milner Bennetts, F.Z.S. 
M.P. Bentley, O.B.E., C.Eng. 



Miss M.M. Brooks, Ph.C. M.R.Pharm.S., 
F.Z.S. F.R.S.H., F.R.E.S. 

Mrs M.K. Parkinson 

Mrs W. Chome 

Miss M.W.S. Davis 

Miss M. Stocker, B.A. 

Mrs J. George 

M.P. Bentley O.B.E., C.Eng. 



TRUSTEES: 



CHAIRMAN OF COUNCIL: 
DEPUTY CHAIRMAN: 



J.G. Parkinson, F.Z.S. 
Willliam H. Lee 

J.G. Parkinson. F.Z.S 
Miss M.W.S. Davis 



OFFICERS: 



SECRETARY 
TREASURER 
DEPUTY SECRETARY 
ASSISTANT SECRETARY 
PROGRAMME SECRETARY 
PRESS OFFICER 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 
EDITOR 
LIBRARIAN 
CURATOR 
SLIDES CUSTODIAN 
SLIDES CONSULTANT 
PROJECTIONISTS - STILL 
CINE 



F. R. Watson 

T.P. Whieldon, B.Sc. 

M.P. Bentley, O.B.E., C.Eng. 

Miss R.H.D. Winter 

Mrs M.W. Saunders 

Mrs S. Thomas 

Mrs I. Towndrow 

Miss E. Oldfield 

R.E. Harwood 

G. Teasdili F.M.A., F.R.S.A., F.R.N.S., F.Z.S. 

F. R. Watson 
J.C. Mitton 

G. H. Wilson 
W.Hardy 



CHAIRMEN OF 
ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY 
ASTRONOMY 
BOTANY 
GEOGRAPHY 
GEOLOGY 
HORTICULTURE 
PHOTOGRAPHY 
PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 
ZOOLOGY - ENTOMOLOGY 

MAMMALIA 
ORNITHOLOGY 
MEMBERS' DAY 



SECTIONS: 

Miss M. Stocker, B.A. 
G. Nash. MA. F.R.A.S. 
Miss S. Mackintosh 
Miss M.W.S. Davis 
Mrs V.E.Copp, B.A., F.G.S. 
Miss M. Blower 
Mrs G.E. Obee 
Rev. F.W. King 

Miss M.M.Brooks, PhC. M.R.Pharm.S. 

F.R.S.H., F.R.E.S. 

Miss K. Milner Bennetts. F.Z.S. 

Mrs L.M. Maddox 

Mrs H.M. Dickinson 



A Andrew M.A. 
Mrs M Arnold 
W.A.H. Arnold 
Miss B.M. Ball 
W.L. George 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 
ELECTED MEMBERS: 



Miss E. Hayter 
Mrs. K. Lawrence 
A. Osborn 
H.A. Westrap 



BANKERS: National Westminster Bank, PLC, The Square, Bournemouth 
HON. AUDITORS: A.G. Jenkinson, B.Sc, G. Sparkes M.I.E.E. 



6 



COMMITTEES, 1990-91 



FINANCE AND GENERAL PURPOSES: 
CHAIRMAN: J.G. PARKINSON, F.Z.S. 



PRESIDENT, DEPUTY CHAIRMAN, HON. TREASURER, HON. SECRETARY, CHAIRMAN OF 
PROGRAMME COMMITTEE, CHAIRMAN OF MUStUM COMMITTEE, HON. DEPUTY SECRETARY 
HON . ASSISTANT TREASURER, HON. ASSISTANT SECRETARY , (all ex officio) 
W.H. Lee, Miss K . Mi InerBennetts , W.A.H. Arnold 



MUSEUM: 

CHAIRMAN: Mrs. J. George 

CURATOR : G. Teasdill; DEPUTY CURATOR: A. Osborn 

CHAIRMEN OF SECTIONS: 
R.S. George, Mrs. S. Thomas, Mrs. M. Duncan, F.W. King, H.A. Westrap 



LIBRARY: 
CHAIRMAN: Miss P.E. Winter 



LIBRARIAN: R.E. Harwood 



A. Andrew, Miss J.M. Merchant 
Miss L.M. Rowe, Mrs. H. Dickinson 



HOUSE: 

W.A.H. Arnold, F.R. Watson 

GARDEN: 
CHAIRMAN: Miss M. Blower 



Mrs. W. Chome, S. Huggins, Mrs. L.V. Nicklen, Mrs. R.C. Crane, 
Miss S. Mackintosh, L.H. Shepherd, Mrs. G.E. Obee, 

TEA AND ENTERTAINMENT: 



CHAIRMAN: Mrs. M.K. Parkinson 



Mrs. J.E. Crompton, Mrs. H.M. Dickinson, Mrs. E. Hardy. Mrs. P. Hood, 
Miss C.W. Jarrold, Mrs. G.Kernon, Mrs. K. Lawrence, Mrs. J. Macdonald, 
Miss W.A. Saunders, Mrs. L.Wheeler, Mrs. M. Whieldon, Mrs. D. Wood 



PROGRAMME 

CHAIRMAN: Mrs. L.M. Maddox 
Mrs. M.W. Saunders, CHAIRMEN OF SECTIONS 



7 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



Revised to 31st October 1990 

* HONORARY MEMBER L LIFE MEMBER 

V VICE-PRESIDENT A ASSOCIATE MEMBER 

+ PAST PRESIDENT 

The year of election is given before the name of each member 
Unless otherwise stated all addresses are in Bournemouth. 

1990 Abineri, K.W. B.Sc. 42 West Borough, Wimborne BH21 1WQ 

1987 Aitken, Major R.C., B.Sc. 42 Priory View Road, BH9 3JQ 
1987 Aitken, Mrs. S.A., B.A. 

1963 * Allen, Miss M. 174 Holdenhurst Road, BH3 8AS 

1971 Allin, Mrs. J.M. 14 Oakwood Road, Highcliffe, BH23 5NH 

1986 Allin, M.E.A., L.D.S. 3 Private Road, Marsh Lane, Lymington S041 9EW 

1987 Allin, Mrs. P.F.D. 

1960 Alsford, Mrs J.R. 20 Church Road, Ferndown, BH22 9EU 

1989 Anderson, Mrs. J.L. 24 Baronsmede, 17 Branksome Wood Road BH2 6PE 

1977 Andrew, A., M.A. F7 Pine Grange, Bath Road, BH1 2PN 

1978 Andrew, Miss. E. 34 Tollard Court, West Hill Road BH2 5EH 
1986 Andrews, Mrs. D.L. 8 Champions Court, Henlow Drive, Dursley, 

Glos. GL11 4BE 

1989 Andrews, J. 20 Okeford Road, Broadstone BH18 8PA 
1989 Andrews, Mrs. P. 

1983 Arden, Miss K.N.J. 8 Ardmore Lodge, Ardmore Road, Poole BH14 8SA 

1985 Arnold, W.A.H. 8 Cranleigh Gardens, BH6 5LE 
1967 L Arnold, Mrs. M. 

1989 Arnold, W.G. The Pantiles, School Lane, Thorney Hill, 

Christchurch BH23 8DT 

1989 Arnold, Mrs. N.E. 

1986 Artless, Mrs E.J. 47B Parkwood Road, BH5 2BS 

1982 Ascher, P. 110 Bure Homage, Mudeford BH23 4DR 
1982 Ascher, Mrs E.R. 

1975 Ash, Miss C.C. 22 Pendennis, 7 Derby Road BH1 3PU 

1986 Ashbee, Miss M. 63 Saxonbury Road, BH6 5ND 
1974 Ayton, D.J. 201 Kinson Road, BH10 5HB 

1987 Atyeo, G.H. 31 Solent Road, BH6 4BP 

1987 Atyeo, Mrs. M.A. 

1989 Ayles, Mrs. N. 1 The Lawns, 60 Southbourne Road BH6 5AE 

1977 Ball, Miss B.M. 25a Dingle Road, BH5 2DP 

1966 L Band, Miss E«, B.A. 9 Deveron Lodge, 23 Christchurch Road, BH1 3NS 

1990 Banks, Miss B.R. Pine Cottage, 1 Pine Avenue BH6 3SN 

1985 Barraclough, P.K. 157 Cooden Sea Road, Bexhill on Sea TN39 4TE 

1971 L Bartram, T., F.N.I.M.H. 6 Browning Avenue, BH5 INN 
F.R.S.H., F.H.A. 

1978 Bateson, Miss J. 8 Meadow Crt., Leigh Common, Wimborne BH21 2BG 
1982 Baxter, Miss K.C. 13 Glencoe Road, BH7 7BE 

1990 Beatson, Mrs. J. 38 Granville Road BH5 2AH 

1988 Behennah, F.E., C. ENG., 11 Pine Manor Road, Ashley Heath, Ringwood 
FRAeS, FIMechE, FIQA, FBIS. BH24 2EZ 

1963*+V Bennetts, Miss K.M., 29 Belle Vue Gardens, Belle Vue Road BH6 3BG 
F.Z.S. 



- 8 - 



1979 Benson, Mrs. R. 6 Moat Lane, Barton-on-Sea , BH25 7JG 

1980 Bentley, M.P., 5 Bournewood Drive, BH4 9JP 
O.B.E., C.Eng. 

1980 Bentley, Mrs., E.P.,A.T.D. 

1986 Berington, J. Flat 2, 1 St. August ines Road, BH2 6NX 

1951 L Blandford, Mrs. R.I. B18 Elizabeth Court, Grove Road, BH1 3DU 

1964 x Blower, Miss M. 32 Selkirk Close, Merley, Wimborne BH21 2JP 

1989 Bolton, C.M.G., M.SC, FGS. 47 Meyrick Court, St. Winifred's Rd, BH2 6PH 

1990 Booth G.C., M.Sc. 23 Fairview Crescent, Broadstone BH18 9AL 
1989 Bostock, Mrs. A. 6 Rowena Road, BH6 8AE 

1989 Boultwood, K.S. 30 Verity Crescent, Cenford Heath, Poole, 

1988 Boultwood, Mrs. 1.0. BH17 7TJ " 

1989 Bowden, Mrs. M.E. B4 Pine Grange, Bath Road BH1 2PQ 
1983 Boynes, R.C. 43 Keith Road, BH3 70S 

1983 Boynes, Mrs. R. " 

1984 Branch, J. 17 Alexandra Road, BH6 5JA 
1984 Braund, Miss C.H., B.Sc. 19 William Road, BH7 7BB 
1968 Brazier, Miss. M.A. 4 Cedar Avenue, BH10 7EF 
1989 L Bridal, J.R. 44 Iddesleigh Road, BH3 7 HQ 

1989 Brinkman, Mrs. D.J. 3 Victory Court, 33 Boscombe Spa Road BH5 IAS 
1970 Brooks, J.L. 7 Milton Road, Wimborne, BH21 1 NY 

1970+VL Brooks, Miss. M.M., Ph.C. 

M.R. Pharm.S.,F.R.S.H.,F.R.E.S. 

1978 Brotherton, Miss H.J., J. P. 58 Pearce Avenue, Poole, BH14 8EH 

C.B.E. 

1990 Brown, Miss M. M.B.E. 37 Portman Road, Boscombe BH7 6EX 
1937+V* Brown, S.C.S. ,F.D.S. 158 Harewood Avenue, BH7 7BG 
(1967) R.C.S., L.D.S. 

1988 Bunting,. C.A. 17 Freshwater Road, Friars Cliff, 

Christchurch, BH23 4ED 

1988 Bunting, Mrs. B. 

1986 L Burch, Miss O.E. 10 Chatsworth Road, Poole, BH14 6QL 

1990 Burt, Mrs. D.M. 12 Copper Beech Grdns, Ensbury Park BH10 SD13 

1988 Burton, Mrs M. 21 Hamilton Court, Johnstone Road, 

Christchurch, BH23 7NG 

1930 Bury, Miss, G.J. 10 Rossley Close, Christchurch, BH23 4RR 

1977 Butt, Mrs J.M. 599 Chilbridge, Hillbutts, Wimborne BH21 4DS 

1989 Carlton, Miss. L., M.A. 1A Michelgrove Road, BH5 1JH 

1964 Cartwright Miss D.E., M.B.E. 31 Wistaria House, Redhill Drive, BH10 6AE 

1989 Cecil, Mrs. M. 9 Highfield, 112 Belle Vue Road BH6 3BH 
1988 Chatterton, R.H. 93 South Western Crescent, Poole, BH14 8PP 
1942 X V Chome, Mrs W. Queensmount, 19 Queens Park West Drive BH8 9 DA 
1988 Chown, P. 18 Felton Road, Poole, BH14 OQS 

1988 Chown, Mrs J. 

1974 L Clapton, Miss D.E. 1 Alington, 25 Marlborough Road, BH4 8DE 

1977 Clasby, P.S. 12 Haglane Copse, Lymington, S04 8DT 

1963 L Clode, J.C. . c/o Barclays Bank PLC, 1462 Wimborne Road 

1963 Clode, Mrs V.M. BH10 7AS 

1990 Coast, Mrs. 0. 14 Raysclift, 58 West Cliff Road BH4 8BE 
1983 Collings R, B.A., P.G.C.E. 73 Harland Road, BH6 4DW 

1981 Colyer, L.E. 51 Parkwood Road, BH5 2BS 
1981 Colyer, Mrs W.M. 

1941 L Cooper, Mrs. E.M. B18 Elizabeth Court, Grove Road BH1 3DU 

1989 Conway, J. 117 Norton Road, BH9 2QB 
1989 Conway, Mrs. S.M. 

1976 Copp, Mrs. V.E. B.A., F.G.S. 41 Feversham Avenue BH8 9NH 

1986 Corrick, Mrs. M. 15/3 The Avenue, Poole BH13 6AD 



- 9 - 



1987 Cou lan, Mrs A. 86 Homelake House, Station Road, Parkstone, 

BH14 8UD 

1986 Cowles, Mrs M.M. 16 Clowes Avenue, BH6 4ES 

1990 Cox, Miss D.A.E., C.S.P. Benniston House, 49 Christchurch Road BH1 3PA 

1986 Craddock, M.S., B.Sc. 7 Lytton Road, BH1 4SH 

1973 Crane, Mrs R.C. 11 Dewlands Park, West Close, Verwood, 

BH21 6PR 

1977 Crompton, Mrs J.E. 148 Evering Avenue, Poole BH12 4JH 

1982 Crooks, Miss L. 42 Belle Vue Gardens, Belle Vue Road, BH6 3BG 
1975 Curtis, Mrs B. 114 Cutlers Place, Wimborne, BH21 2AZ 

1975 Dain, Mrs. D. Ill Bader Road, Canford Heath, Poole, BH17 7PW 

1983 Dales, F.R. E17 San Remo Towers, Sea Road BH5 1JY 

1987 Davies, S. 88 Castle Road, BH9 1PN 
1987 Davies, Mrs M. 

1976 L Davis, Mrs B. 9 Oratory Gardens, Martello Road South, Poole, 

BH13 7HJ 

1976 +V Davis, Miss M.W.S. 26 William Road, BH7 7BA 

1987 Day R.C. 25 Parkway Drive, BH8 9JW 

1967 Deacon, Miss M.G.K. 42 Belmont Road, Poole, BH14 ODB 

1988 DeConinck, Mrs. B. 34 Crescent Court, Chine Crescent BH2 5LA 

1975 Dickinson, Mrs H.M. 9a Moorland Road, BH1 3ST 

1972 Dolamore, Mrs M. 15 Dene Walk, Ferndown, BH22 8PQ 

1980 Downes, J. P. 10 Leslie Road, BH9 2JH 
1970 Draper, G.S. 44 Brackendale Road, BH8 9JA 
1970 Draper, Mrs O.G. 

1988 Draycon, Miss E.P. 51 Talbot Road, BH9 2JB 

1983 Drew, Mrs. C.M.F. 4 Bower Road, BH8 9HQ 

1955 Dudley, Mrs I. 17 Widdicombe Avenue, Poole BH14 9QW 

1987 Dufall, Mrs R. 32 Mallard Road, BH8 9PL 

1985 Duncan, Mrs M. 3/88 Richmond Park Avenue, BH8 9DR 

1985 DuPuy, Mrs G. 5 Beechwood Court, 5 Stourwood Avenue, BH6 3PN 

1978 Eames, K.M., F.C.A. 152 Cranleigh Road, BH6 5JP 

1978 Eames, Mrs I.L. 

1974 Easterbrook L 4 The Pines, 38 The Avenue, Poole BH13 6HJ 
1974 Easterbrook, Mrs. F.P. 

1989 Edgley, Mrs. B. 8 Purbeck Court, Boscombe Overcliff Drive, 

BH5 2EN 

1984 Edwards G. 65 Alvescot Road, Carterton, Oxford 0X8 3JP 
1984 Edwards, Mrs.G. 

1989 Edwards, Mrs. H.A. 29 Wellington Road, Poole BH14 9LF 

1979 Elgood, J.H., M.A. 26 Walkford Way, Highcliffe, BH23 5LP 
1979 Elliott, Miss M. 87 The Grove, Christchurch, BH23 2HD 

1990 Emerson, Miss J. 8 Haven Road, Corfe Mullen BH21 3SY 

1976 Erskine, S.L . W. ,M.D . ,D .P .H . 16 Oakwood Road, Christchurch BH23 5NH 
1976 Erskine, Mrs K.M. 

1990 Etches, Mr S. 3 Colborne Avenue, The Vineries, Wimborne 

BH21 2PZ 

1982 Evelyn, Mrs M. 30 Mayford Road, Poole, BH12 1PU 

1960 Exton, Miss J.M. 4 Worthington Crescent, Poole, BH14 8BW 

1953 L Farwell, Mrs S.M.A. Latch Farm. Fairmile, Christchurch BH23 2LB 

1987 Fearon, Mrs N.M. 18 Heathwood Road, BH9 2JX 

1965 Fildes, Mrs E.M. 45 Wickfield Avenue, 

Christchurch, BH23 1JA 

1981 Fitsgibbon, Miss M.T. 41 Homeleigh House, 52 Wellington Road, 

BH8 8LF 



- 10 - 



1982 




Foot, Miss G.M. 


1979 




Forrest, L.G. 


1986 




Fowkes, Mrs G.W. 


1990 




Francis, Mrs. P.M. 


1988 




Funk, M.J., M.R.C.S. 


1988 




Funk, Mrs M. I . , M.R. 






Pharm.S. 


1987 




Galpin, Mrs H.I . 


1982 




Gandy, F.W. 


1989 




Garton, Mrs. Y.C. 


1989 




George, R.S., C.Biol. 






M.Biol, FLS, FRES 


1989 




George, Mrs. D.E.L. 


1974 




George, W.L. 


1974 


+ V 


George, Mrs J. 


1988 




Gibbs, F.P. ARIBA 


1989 




Gilpin, R.E. A.I.A.C. 


1989 




Gilpin, Mrs. L.A. 


1980 




Glass, A. 


1980 




Glass, Mrs P . 


1984 




Gonzalez - Nache, Mrs C.J 


1987 




Gorman, P. 


1981 




Gould, A.R. 


1981 




Gould, Mrs M.C. 


1988 


A 


Graham, J.T. 


1977 


L 


Gray, Mrs, J.F., B.A. 


1985 




Green, Mrs R.E. 


1989 




Gregory, A., B.Sc.,ACSM 


1978 




Guscott, W.J., C.Eng., 






F.I.E.E. 


1988 




Hack,S.R., C.Eng. 


1988 




Hack, Mrs M.M. 


1990 




Hackworth, Miss J.E.C. 


1982 




Halford, Miss A. 


1986 




Hall, Mrs D. 


1988 




Hall , Mrs H .E . 


1990 




Hancock, Miss CM. 


1972 




Hanna, H.J. A. 


1971 




Hanna, Mrs K.A., M.A. 


1972 




Harding, R. 


1976 




Hardy, W. 


1976 




Hardy, Mrs E. 


1989 




Harris, Mrs. C. 


1984 




Harrison, K.J. 


1984 




Harrison, Mrs W.M. 


1986 




Hart, Miss M.E.A.S. 


1978 




Harwood, R.E. 


1 Q7R 




Harwood , Mrs A.M. 


1964 




Hatton, R.H.S., M.A. 


1988 




Hawkins, A.J., F.C. B.S.I. 


1988 




Hawkins, Mrs A.J. 


1973 




Hayball, Miss G. 



C6 Twynham Court, Dean Park Road BH1 1JB 
30 Meyrick Court, St. Winifred's Road, BH2 6PH 
Flat 5, Retired Nurses Home, Riverside Avenue, 
BH7 7ES 

1 Delamere Gardens, Ensbury Park, BH10 6AA 
40 Ocean Heights, Boscombe Cliff Road 

BH5 1LA 

191 Tuckton Road, BH6 3LB 

75 Littledown Avenue, BH7 7MX 

2 Stourbank Road, Christchurch BH23 1LM 
54 Richmond Park Avenue BH8 9DR 



5 Willow Park, Park Road, Poole BH14 OJP 

ii ii n 

50 Vallis Close, Fisherman's Wharf, Poole, 
BH15 1XZ 

29 Keswick Road BH5 1LR 

6 Horseshoe Court, Dean Park Road BH1 1HU 

34 Bridport Road, Poole, BH12 4BY 
24 Hazel Drive, Ferndown BH22 9SW 
11 The Boltons, Portar lington Rd BH4 8DA 

34 Dudsbury Avenue, Ferndown, BH22 8DU 
62 Dulsie Road, BH3 7ED 
9 St.Kilda, 9 Stourwood Avenue, BH6 3PR 
31 Whitecliff Road, Poole BH14 8DX 

7 Wick Lane, BH6 4JT 



39 Dunkeld Rd, BH3 7EW 

22 Derby Road, BH1 3QA 
15 Poole Road, BH2 5QR 

B9 St. Catherines Court, 35 Christchurch Road, 
BH1 3NS 

18 Pine Avenue, BH6 3SN 

Flat 1, 66 Carbery Avenue, BH6 3LG 

6 Cliffe Road, Barton-on-Sea BH25 7PB 
n ii H 

3 Portchester Place, BH8 8JS 

1 Gorsecliff Court, 5 Boscombe Spa Road 

BH5 1AW 

26 Firs Glen Road, West Moors, Wimborne 
BH22 OED 

49 Sheldrake Road, Mudeford, BH234BP 

13A Dunbar Road, BH3 7AZ 

10 Blakehill Crescent, Poole BH14 8QR 
ii ii ii 

Pine Cottage, Lower Rowe, Holt BH21 7DZ 
15 Beamish Road, Canford Heath BH17 7SQ 

85 Homelake House, 36 Station Road, Parkstone 
BH14 8UD 



- 11 - 



1969 


Hayter, Miss E. 


1985 


Haywood, P.J., B.Sc. 


1985 


Haywood, Mrs V.J. 


1988 


Hearnshaw, Mrs A. A. 


1971 


Heaton, Mrs M. I . 


1989 


Henesey, Mrs. M. 


1990 


Hill, Dr. V. J.D., Ph.D 




B.Met. ,FIM. 


1989 


Hill, Mrs. M.B. 


1985 


Hilton, J., M.A. 


1985 


Hi Iton, Mrs D., B.Sc. 


1985 


Hi It on, Miss A.J. 


1973 


Hilton, Miss M.L., 




B.Sc. , Ph.D. 


1962 x 


Hipperson, Miss M. 


1979 


Hodgetts, Mrs E.P. 


1974 


Holmes, Mrs H.N. 


1984 


Hood, Mrs P. 


1990 


Howlett, Miss J.M. 


1980 


Huggins, S. 


1983 


Hull, Mrs P.F. 


1979 


Hyde, R.A. 


1979 


Hyde, Mrs. B.F. 


1989 


lies, Miss. N.W. 


1983 


Illingworth, Mrs J. 


1983 


Jackson, P.E. 


1972 


Jarrold, Miss C.W. 


1980 


Jenkinson, A.G., B.Sc. 


1977 


Jesty, Mrs H.S. 


1976 


Jordan, L.E. 


1976 


Jordan, Mrs V .M. 


1970 


Kent, H.M., B.Sc. 


1970 


Kent, Mrs M. 


1986 


Kernon, Mrs G.L. 


1968 L 


Kernot, Miss F.L. 


1985 


King, Rev . t- . w. 


1985 


King, Mrs K.A. 


1987 


Kirkpatrick, P.C. 


1988 


Knight, Miss J. 


197/ 


Langtord, H.H.L. 


1989 


Larsson, Mrs. P.M., M.A 


1980 


Laughrin, I.G. 


1980 


Laughrin, Mrs H.M. 


1987 


Lawless, Mrs M. 


1979 


Lawrence, H., 


1979 


Lawrence, Mrs K. 


1984 


Lawton, Mrs F.E. 


1982 


Layton, S.F. 


1987 


Leather, Mrs. L.G. 


1966 +V 


Lee, W.H. 


1967 


Lee, Mrs. L.B. 



38 Edgehill Road, BH9 2PQ 
74 Alyth Road, BH3 7ND 

58 Beaufort Road, BH6 5AN 
8 Mayfair, 74 Westcliff Road, BH4 8BG 
1 Imber Drive, Highcliffe, Christchurch 
BH23 5BE 

, 6 Chine Grange, 8 Chine Crescent BH2 5LL 



1 Weston Grange, 10 Gervis Rd BH1 3EG 

6 Burley Grange, 3 Weston Drive BH1 3EH 

47 Belle Vue Gardens, Belle Vue Road, BH6 3DF 

19 Richmond Wood Road, BH8 9DG 

C12 35 Christchurch Road, BH1 3NS 

4 Chepping Dene, 15 Wimborne Road BH2 6LY 

36 Springbourne Court, 130 Windham Road, 

BH1 4RD 

242 Iford Lane, BH6 5NF 

33 Hartley Down, 60 Christchurch Road, BH1 3PJ 
12 Hilton Grange, 20 Knyveton Road BH1 3QS 

7 Coy Pond Road, Poole, BH12 1JT 



Flat 2, 5 St. John's Road, BH5 1EQ 

25 Baronsmede, 17 Branksome Wood Road, BH2 6DE 

6 St. Swithuns Road South, BH1 3RQ 

B35 San Remo Towers, Sea Road, BH5 US 

4 Warren Edge Road, BH6 4AU 

Afterthoughts, Spetisbury, Blandford DT11 9DF 

18 Braidley Road, BH2 6JX 



62 Canberra Road, Christchurch BH23 2HW 

652 Castle Lane West, BH8 9UG 

5 Edward May Court, Mount Rd, Kinson, BH11 8AW 

51a Clingan Road, BH6 5PZ 

7 Marchwood, Manor Road, BH1 3EY 

127 The Grove, Christchurch, BH23 2EZ 

8 Gordon Court, 38 Surrey Road BH4 9BY 
50 Craigmoor Avenue, BH8 9LP 

54 Eastcliff Way, Christchurch BH23 4EY 

5 Twynham Court, Twynham Road, BH6 4AN 
27 Gladstone Road West, BH1 4HZ 

67 Homeways House, 10 Pine Tree Glen, BH4 9ES 

7 Sycamore Close, Christchurch BH23 2EL 

8 Norwich Mansions, Norwich Avenue West 
BH2 6AL 

18 Ravenshall, West Cliff Road, BH4 8AT 



- 12 - 



1975 Lees, R.G. 4 Seacliff Court, Clifton Road BH6 3PB 

1981 Leonard, Mrs A.C. 12 Argyle Road, Chri stchurch , BH23 3NW 

1983 Le Pard, D.A., F.R.E.S. Silver Crest, Silver Street, Sway, S041 6DF 

1983 Le Pard, G., B.Sc, F.R.E.S. Matchams View, Hum Road, Ringwood BH24 2BP 

1985 Levick, Mrs. E.M. 25 Crescent Court, Chine Crescent, BH2 5LA 

1983 Levy, D.R.H. 25 Cedar Avenue, Chri stchurch BH23 2PS 
1970 Lilly, Mrs P. 78 St. Lukes Road, BH3 7LU 

1975 Lister, Dr. M. , M. Sc., Ph.D. 6 Katterns Close, Christchurch BH23 2HS 

1986 Loader, W.E. 28 Parkway Drive, BH8 9JW 

1986 Loader, Mrs D. " 

1987 Loakes, Mrs J.M. 8 Leven Close, BH4 9LF 

1934*+V Lowther, Miss D.M., B.Sc. Torestin Residential home, Piers Cross, 

Haverfordwest, Dyfed, Wales 

1984 Luckett, Miss J. 9 Wilverley Gardens, Queens Road, Blandford, 

DT11 7LE 

1976 Lund, Mrs M.S. 8 William Road, BH7 7BA 
1990 Lyndon, Mrs. Molly 42F Moore Avenue BH11 8BA 

1988 McClumpha, M.J. 10 Devon Road, Poole, BH15 3QQ 
1986 McDiarmid, L. 7A Beechwood Avenue, BH5 1LZ 

1988 A McKenzie, G. 26c Crabton Close Road, BH5 1HN 

1974 McMullin, Mrs E.G. B8 St. Catherines Court, 35 Christchurch Road, 

BH1 3NS 

1986 Macdonald, Mrs J. B.A. D5 Kings Walk, 19A Knyveton Road BH1 3QZ 

1983 Mackintosh, Miss S.M. 52 Coombe Avenue, BH10 5AE 
1973 Maddox, C.B.M. 31 Egerton Road, BH8 9AY 
1956 * Maddox, Mrs L.M. 

1978 Mann, Mrs M. 9 Endfield Close, Christchurch BH23 2HH 

1990 Manning, Mrs. D.P. B.Sc. 12 Romney Road BH10 6JR 

1984 Marsh, Mrs S.M. 8 Holme Road, Highcliffe, BH23 5LJ 

1976 Merchant, Miss J.M. 7 Stourton Court, Marlborough Road, BH4 8DE 

1989 Miles, K.E.T. Ill Station Road, West Moors Wimborne BH22 OHS 
1989 Miles, Mrs. E. 

1983 Mitchell, Miss J.E. 266 Holdenhurst Road, BH8 8AW 

1984 Mitchell, S.F., M.I.E.E. 162 Cranleigh Road, BH6 5JD 
1959 *V Mitton, J.C. 3 Gainsborough Road, BH7 7BD 
1970 Mitton, Mrs M. 

1987 Monk, Mrs B.E. 41 Boundary Road, BH10 4HN 

1972 Moore, W.H. 13 Eldon Road, BH9 2RT 

1981 Morgan, W.D. 47 Sandecotes Road, Poole, BH14 8PA 

1973 Morris, T.E . Sandpit, Frogham Hill, Fordingbridge , SP6 2HW 
1973 Morris, Mrs J.F. 

1989 Mosley, Mrs. H. 2 Rayscliff, 58 West Cliff Road BH4 8BE 

1989 Mosley, Miss K., LRAM. 4 Bolton Court, Belle Vue Road BH6 3DQ 

1984 Mountain, Mrs A. 10 Elms Avenue, Lilliput, BH14 8EF 

1989 Murray, A.R. 48 Rempstone Road, Merley, Wimborne BH21 1RP 

1989 Murray, Mrs. E.E. 

1973 Nash, G., M.A., F.R.A.S 12 St. Annes Road, Upton, Poole BH16 5PT 

1990 Newitt, Mrs. Jessie 22 Venning Avenue, Bear Cross BH11 9QF 

1984 Newman, Mrs E.M. C7 St. Catherines Court, 35 Christchurch Road, 

BH1 3NS 

1967 Nicklen, Mrs L.V. 77 Holdenhurst Avenue, BH7 6RB 

1988 Norman, Miss N. B.A. 49 Christchurch Road, BH1 3PA > 
1984 North, K.J. 12 Littledown Avenue, BH7 7 AN 

1977 North, Mrs J.L. 

1988 Norton, Mrs B.M. 15 Dewlands Park, Verwood, BH21 6DR 

1977 L Norvall, Miss A.C. 23 Exton Road, BH6 5FQ 



- 13 - 



1982 Obee, Mrs G.E. 16 Southwick Road, BH6 5PT 

1989 O'Brien, Mrs. M. Dip Arch. 7 Richmond Chambers, The Square BH2 6EE 

1986 Odam, Mrs L.M. D13 San Remo Towers, Sea Road, BH5 1JT 

1957 Odell, Mrs G.B. 4 Barclay Mansions, St. Valerie Road, BH2 6PF 

1970 Offen, E.C. 4 Ranelagh Road, Highcliffe, Christchurch 

1970 Offen, Mrs M.J. BH23 5DY 

1989 Okey, K.H. 37 Pearce Avenue, Poole, BH14 8EG 

1989 Olden, N.R. Abberleigh House, 46 Southwood Avenue BH6 3QB 

1986 Oldfield, Miss E. 66 Keith Road, BH3 7DX 

1989 Orford, Miss P.B. 3 Lords Close, Canford Heath, Poole BH17 7SW 

1987 Osborn, A. 12 Stibbs Way, Bransgore, BH23 8HS 
1987 Osborn, Mrs R. 

1987 Page, Mrs M.R. 8 Craigmoor Close, BH8 9LU 

1990 Parfitt, Miss B.D.K. 8 Haven Road, Corfe Mullen BH21 3SY 
1969+VL* Parkinson, J.G., F.Z.S. 45 Belle Vue Road, BH6 3DF 
1969+VL* Parkinson, Mrs M.K. 

1963 L Payne, Miss H.I. 60 St Albans Avenue, BH8 9EQ 

1983 Pearce, Mrs L.E. 26 Berkley Manor, 317 Poole Rd, Poole BH12 1AA 

1984 Phillips, Miss M.A. 9 Derby Road, BH1 3PX 

1989 Philipson, Mrs. S. 8b Bath Hill Court, Bath Road BH1 2HT 

1986 Pike, Mrs L. 5 Wellesley Court, 36 Wellington Road, BH8 8JS 

1983 L Pinm'ger, R.S., M.R.C.V.S. 50 Branksome Wood Road, Poole BH12 1HR 

1989 Ponsford, Mrs R.E.M. 18 Seaway Avenue, Friars Cliff, Christchurch 

BH23 4EU 

198/ Pope, A.E., C.E., M.I.E.R.E. 33 Pine Crescent, Christchurch, BH23 4LH 

1987 Preston, Prof. T.A.,M.A., 30 Russell Drive, Christchurch BH23 3PA 
F.M.S.,N.A.I.C.,M.A.S.A.Eng. 

1989 Punter, Miss A. 33 The Grove, Christchurch BH23 2EY 

1982 Pursey, Mrs R.M. 1 Stour View Court, 118 Hum Road, 

Christchurch, BH23 2RP 

1988 Quaife, Mrs G.L. 10 Felton Road, Poole, BH14 OQS 

1989 Quarm, R. Flat 1 1 Boscombe Overcliff Drive BH5 1JB 

1989 Quarm, Mrs B. 

1979 Randall, Mrs C. 4 Mude Gardens, Mudeford, BH23 4AK 

197b Ratcliffe, G.L., F.C.A. 11 Penrith Road, BH5 1LT 

1975 Ratcliffe, Mrs M.N. 

1985 Raumann, S., B.Sc. 5 Elphinstone Road, Christchurch BH23 5LL 
1985 Raumann, Mrs M.S., B.A. 

1984 Roberts, Miss E. F12 Pine Grange, Bath Road, BH1 2PN 
1988 Roberts, M. B.Sc. 19 Lacy Drive, Wimborne, BH21 1£Y 
1988 Roberts, Mrs M.E. 

1977 Robins, W.O., A.R.I.C.S. 85 Petersfield Road, BH7 6QN 

1979 Robins, Mrs F.V. 

1963 L Rossiter, Mrs D.M. 5 Park Homer Rd, Colehill, Wimborne BH21 2SP 

1970 Rowe, Miss L.M. 23 The Bluff, Headswell Crescent, BH10 6LQ 

1967 Russell-Cotes Art Gallery East Cliff, Bournemouth, BH1 3AA 

1975 Rust, Mrs P. 95 Holdenhurst Avenue, BH7 6RB 

1990 Ruth, Mr A.B. M.A., 1 Grovely Avenue BH5 1JA 

1988 Santall, Mrs P.B. 262A Windham Road, BH1 4QX 

1980 Saunders, Miss B.A. Dormer Cottage, Gaunts Common, Wimborne, 

BH21 4JR 

1975 L Saunders, Mrs M.W. 2 Memorial Homes, Castle Lane, BH8 9TP 

1954 Saunders, Miss W.A. Arnewood House Rest Home, 2 Arnewood Road 

BH6 5DG 



- 14 - 



1970 Scott, S.A. 6 The Close, Charlton Marshall, Blandtora 
1985 Scott, Mrs A.E. DT11 /HA 

1976 Scutter, Mrs L.M. 12 Oakwood Road, Highcliffe, BH23 5NH 

1951 Sewell, Mrs I . 4 Maundeville Crescent, Chri stchurch , BH23 2EW 

1988 Sharland B. 1 Fishers Heron, East Mills, Fordingbridae , 

SP6 2JR 

1982 Shaw, L.A., B.Sc, 61 Haven Road, Canford Cliffs, BH13 7LH 

M.I.Mech.E., F.R.N.S. 

1990 Shaw, Mrs. J. 

1981 L Shepherd, L.H. 1 Coronation Avenue, BH9 1TN 

1982 Shewring, Miss J., M.A. 19 William Road, BH7 7BB 

198/ Ship, Miss M. 18 Cranleigh Court, Cranleigh Road BH6 5JZ 

1985 Shute, Miss W. 8 Upton Way, Broadstone, BH18 9LY 

1984 Simmons, Mrs P. 6 Wychwood Grange, 50 Braidley Road, BH2 6JY 

1983 Simpson, E., B.A., M.Sc. 9 Glenmoor Road, BH9 2L0 
F.R.I.C.S. 

1983 Simpson, Mrs Edna 

1989 Singh, Ur D . , MB., DPH, 3 Villa Riva, 9 Marlborough Rd BH4 8DB 

1990 Skinner, W.J. 21 To 1 lard Court, West Hill Road BH2 bEH 

1989 Slater, Miss B.M. Flat 19, 6 Wimborne Road, BH2 6NG 

1990 Slater, J.D. B.A. 14 Belle Vue Road, BH6 3DP 
1990 Slater Mrs. A.M. 

1986 Smith, J. E.G. 1 Fieldway, Highcliffe, BH23 4QU 
1986 Smith, Mrs B. 

1986 Smith, Mrs S. 20 Purbeck Road, BH2 bEF 

1989 Smith, L., T.Eng.FBIS 3 Grove Road, Barton on Sea, New Milton 

BH25 /DT 

1989 Smith, Mrs J. P. 

1989 Smith, R.L. 36/38 Norwich Ave. West, BH2 6AW 

1975 Souter, Miss E.E. 9 Rowan Close, Highcliffe BH23 4SW 

1971 Southworth, Mrs. N.K.G., M.A. 26 Durley Chine Court, West Cliff Road 

BH2 5HJ 

1976 Sparkes, G., M.I. E.E. 68 Clingan Road, BH6 bQA 
1976 Sparkes, Mrs M. 

1986 Spencer, M.A. 42A Gorleston Road, Poole, BH12 1NW 

1986 Spratt, S.E. 204 Uplands Road, West Moors, Wimborne, 

BH22 OEY 

1988 Spratt, Mrs P.M. 

1984 Stanford, Mrs J.M. 11/ Wick Lane, BH6 4LD 

1987 Stirling, H.C., B.Eng. 17 Greenacres, 22 The Avenue, Poole, BH13 6AJ 

1989 Stirling, Miss J., M.B.E. 1/ Greenacres, 22 Ihe Avenue Poole BH13 6AJ 

1976 +V Stocker, Miss M., B.A. 21 Amberley Court, Bath Road BH1 2NL 

1990 Stockley, F.E. 26 Lincoln Avenue BH1 4QS 
1984 Summerell, Miss B.C. 18 Sunnyhill Road, BH6 4HP 

1988 Sweet, Miss A. 24 Sunnyhill Road, BH6 5HP 

1988 Sweet, Miss B. 

1980 L Sykes, J.R. 11 Castle Lane West, BH9 3LJ 

1979 Taconis, Miss R.M. 78 The Grove, Chri stchurch , BH23 2H0 

1989 Taylor, C.J. 15B Wharfdale Road, BH4 9BT 

1980 Taylor, F. 38 Hillbrow Road, BH6 bNT 
19/9 Taylor, Mrs. M.M. 

196/ +V X Teasdill, G., F.M.A., 99 Carbery Avenue, BH6 3LP 

F.R.S.A., F.R.N.S., F.Z.S. 

1967 Teasdi 11, Mrs N.A. 

1983 Teasdill, Mrs V. 287A Belle Vue Road, BH6 3BB 

1977 Thomas, Mrs S. 106 Sopwith Crescent, Wimborne BH21 ISP 
1988 Thompson, Miss A.R. Flat b, 40 Stirling Road, BH3 /JQ 

1982 Tiller, B.A. bA New Road BH10 /DN 



- lb - 



1982 Tiller, Mrs M . 5A New Road, BH10 7DN 

1988 Tcmkin, Miss N.E., B.A., 59 St. Catherine's Road, BH6 4AD 
MCSP., Dip. TP. 

1975 * Towndrow, Mrs I C4 St. Catherine's Court, 35 Christchurch Rd 

BH1 3NS 

1981 Underhill, Mrs R.A. 25 Leonard Hackett Court, St. Winifred ' s Road, 

BH2 6NY 

1981 L Vassie, G.J., F.R.E.S. 40 Cranleigh Gardens, BH6 5LE 

1981 L Vassie, Mrs B.A. 

1989 Vear, Rev F.H. 3 Glenroyd Gardens BH6 3JN 

1982 Walker, Miss M.J. 18 New Road, Northbourne, BH10 7DT 

1985 L Walker, Miss W.B. 16 North Craig, Windermere, Cumbria LA23 2ET 

1974 x Wall, T.R. 17 St. Mary's Road, Ferndown, BH22 9HB 

1987 Wallbridge, Miss E. 16 Riverside Road, BH6 5NN 

1984 Waller, H.M., B.Ed. 200 Uplands Road, West Moors, BH22 OEY 

1980 Warburg, Mrs A.M. 11 Katterns Close, Christchurch, BH23 2NS 

1977 x Watson, F.R. 79 Brackendale Road, BH8 9HZ 

1988 Webb, Mrs P. 2 Ash Grove, Ashurst, Southampton, S04 2EN 

1988 Weeks, Miss B.E. 37 Howeth Road, BH10 5DY 

1979 Westbrook, Mrs S. 15 Wheelers Lane, Bearwood, BH11 8RR 

1989 Westrap, H.A. 14 Aldridge Road, BH10 5NW 

1989 Whalley, Mrs. L. 12 Headswell Crescent BH10 6LH 

1983 Whattoff, Miss E.M. 48 Belle Vue Gardens, Belle Vue Road BH6 3BG 

1990 Wheat, Miss R.M. 130 Norton Road BH9 2QB 

1990 Wheeler, Mrs. E. 70 Wedgwood Drive, Parkstone BH14 8EX 

1970 X L Wheeler, H.P. 47 Belle Vue Road, BH6 3DD 

1970 L Wheeler, Mrs L. 

1982 L Whieldon, T.P., B.Sc. 10 Branders Lane, BH6 4LL 

1982 L Whieldon, Mrs M. 

1990 White, Miss J.S.P. 25 Surrey Road, BH4 9HW 

1990 White, Miss P. 10 Dorchester Road, Maiden Newton DT2 OBA 

1988 Whiteside, Mrs A. 393 Verity Crescent, Poole BH17 7TS 

1989 Whitmore, Miss S.M. 48 Victoria Road, Poole BH12 3BB 

1978 Whitsed, W.J., F.R.S.A. 41 Feversham Avenue, BH8 9NH 

1990 Williams, M. D.M. B15 San Remo Towers, Sea Road BH5 US 

1985 Williams, B.P. 76 Huntly Road, BH3 7HJ 

1979 Williams, Mrs M, .... 

1987 Williams, Mrs M. 39 Homeleigh House, 52 Wellington Rd BH8 8LF 

1986 Willis, A.G. Chapel Farm, Little Ashby, Cumbria CA16 6QE 
1990 Wilson, Mrs. A.V. 37 Cowleys Road, Burton BH23 7NB 

1985 Wilson, G.H. 15 Mount Pleasant Drive, BH8 9JL 

1972 x Wilson, F.W., F.C.I.S. 9 Pascoe Close, Poole, BH14 ONT 

1988 Windsor, Miss A., B.A. , Dip Ed. 83 Southbourne Overcliff Drive, BH6 3NW 

1976 L Winter, Mrs A.R. 9 The Squirrels, 24A The Avenue BH13 6AF 
1979 x Winter, Miss P.E., M.A. 23 The Anchorage, 157 Mudeford, BH23 4 AG 
1979 +V Winter, Miss R.H.D. 23 The Anchorage, 157 Mudeford, BH23 4 AG 
1948 Wood, Miss E.B., B.Sc. 4 New Park Road, BH6 5AB 

1971 L Wood, Mrs D.L. 6 Crofton Court, 37 Wellington Road, BH8 8JH 

1985 Woodhead, Miss E.T., B.Sc. 7 Compton Lodge, 17 Marlborough Road BH4 8DD 

1986 Woodhead, Mrs F.A., B.Sc. 28 Hungerford Road, BH8 6EH 

1981 Woods, Mrs J.M. 6 Knole Gardens, BH1 3QY 

1983 Workman, Mrs. C.N. 38A Grand Avenue BH6 3TA 

1975 L Wrenn, G. 99 The Avenue, Moordown, BH9 2UX 

1984 Wright, Mrs J . 8 Kimberley Road, Poole, BH14 8SQ 
1967 L Wright, Mrs A.K. 24 Morrison Avenue, Poole, BH12 4 AD 

1990 Zaca, Miss J. B.Sc, M.Ed. Flat 1 Bermuda Court, 11 Derby Road BH1 3PY 



- 16 - 



OBITUARIES 



It is with deep regret that we have tc announce that during the past year the 
following members have died ( the figure in brackets is the year of joining 

the Society):- 



Mrs . 


N. Stephen 


1960 


Miss M. Cox 




1956 


Mrs. 


J.E. Black 


1988 


Mr D. Siggs 




1980 


Mr J 


.R. Ruston 


1970 


Brigadier A.B.D. 


Edwards 


1965 


Mr F 


. Mosley 


1989 


Miss C. Jenkins 




3 976 


Mr P 


.G.H. Hopkins 


1987 


Mrs. A. Foster 




1983 


Mrs. 


E.C. Richards 


1983 


Mrs. B.E. Hooton 


-Smith 


1961 



BRIGADIER ARTHUR B.D. EDWARDS C.B.E., M.C. 

Brigadier Edwards died peacefully on 14th August aged 92 years. 

He was commissioned into the Royal Engineers in 1916 and was constantly in the 

forefront of battle during the First World War. Between the Wars and during the 

Second World War he served with distinction in the Mediterranean and France. He 
retired in 1951. 

Brig. Edwards joined the Society in 1965 and was an active ornithologist. He was 

Chairman in 1968-69 and 1972-75 and Deputy Chairman 1969-72. He was elected Vice 
President in 1975. 



MRS B.E. HOOTON-SMITH 

Barbara Hooton-Smith died on 27th October 1990. She joined the Society in 1961 
and became a life member and Assistant Secretary, an office she held for 23 
years, only resigning earlier this year due to the onset of her illness. Barbara 
undertook a great many jobs for the Society and became an authority on its 
traditions and procedures. She was best known as the keeper of the membership 
records and the distributor of the programmes and Proceedings, a task which 
brought her into contact with a great many members whom she got to know and who 
recognised her as THE source of information. She was of a quiet and serious 
disposition, well loved by all and she will be greatly missed and long 
remembered. 



LEGACIES 

During the year we were most grateful to receive a legacy from the estate of: 

Mrs H.M. French 



- 17 - 



PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS 



SYSTEMS 

by T.P. WH I EL DON B.Sc. 

Delivered before the Society on 13th October 1990 

I looked up the word SYSTEM in my domestic dictionary and I learned that it was 
a noun and that it first appeared in written English J n the 17th Century. It 
came into the English language from the French ' SYSTEME ' , or the late Latin 
' SYSTEMA ' , and it originated from the Greek ' SUSTEMA ' from 'SUN' meaning with or 
together and ' H I STAN A I ' meaning to cause to stand. So although the word SYSTEM 
is of known origin, its comparatively late arrival in our language means that 
there is no stamp of approval which would come from being used by William 
Shakespeare, or by Chaucer, or in the authorised version translation of the Holy 
Bible into English. Reading further in my domestic dictionary there are no less 
than fifteen separate definitions of the word. Some of these are scientific and 
specific, including 

- in GEOLOGY - a stratigraph ica 1 unit for rock strata formed during a period of 
geological time, for example the carboniferous system. 

- in MINERALOGY - one of a group of divisions into which crystals may be 
placed. 

- in CHEMISTRY - a sample of matter in which one or more substances or phases 
exist, such as sulphur which can exist in a crystalline and amorphous state in 
the same sample. 

- in ASTRONOMY - a group of celestial bodies associated by natural laws, like 
our own solar system. 

Some other definitions are more general, such as a network of communication, 
transport or distribution and such as various bodily parts or structures 
anatomically or physiologically related like a nervous system or a respiratory 
system. Still another definition is to do with a recreation of sorts and is a 
method or complex of methods like a roulette system. Two more definitions are in 
the fields of psychology and sociology and are demonstrated in phrases like "Get 
it out of your system" and "It's the system!" 

More to my purpose, the principal definition of the word system reads 
- a group or combination of inter-related, interdependent or interacting 
elements forming a collective entity; a methodical or co-ordinated assemblage of 
parts, facts, concepts etc. 

A further feature about this word system, and a feature not apparent from the 
preceding remarks, is that the entry for the word in my domestic dictionary is 
sixty one millimetres of column length or over two and a quarter inches. The 
entry is longer than for many other words in the 'S' section, without counting 
another fourteen words derived from the word system such as systematic and 
systemic. Sixty one millimetres is more than the column length used for the word 
science, though not longer than the entries for natural and science put 
together. 

This obviously important word, system, might bear further examination perhaps 
along the lines of how we use the word, what we mean by it, what we can learn 
from our use and meaning, what other people are learning about systems and what 
use is being made of ideas about systems. 

Our use of the word system is widespread. It is a safe assertion that the word 
is used every day in every national newspaper and on every broadcasting channel. 
It is probable that each of us uses the word several times a week in thought if 
not in speech or writing. Just taking the alphabet as a framework we can find a 
commonly used phrase naming a type of system for almost every letter, starting 



- 18 - 



with Alarm and going on through Banking, Computer, Distribution, Education, 
Filing, Grid, Heating, Information and so on. We use these names of systems 
freely and easily to designate an object in our conversations or writings or 
thoughts. By themselves, these phrases are not self-defining. They mean 
something to the people in a conversation only because they know which education 
system or ventilation system they are talking about. We use these short phrases 
as an abbreviation, even jargon, but as long as those on the receiving end of the 
communication know what the abbreviation or jargon means then the purpose of the 
communication is fulfilled. 

However, to explore what is meant by the word system let us look at some 
examples. 

What do we mean when we say "filing system"? 

Most people who have worked in offices know of filing systems and most will 
remember occasions when something has been filed and can't be found! Immediately, 
we have begun to clarify what we mean by filing system. It is a system for 
storage and for retrieval of information. The filing system of our conversation 
is normally one to handle information connected with a particular Company or 
Institution or Office or Society or individual, and it must permit the retrieval 
of information when required within a reasonable time. Comparing this 
clarification of The Filing System with our basic definition, we have the 
interconnected elements of information storage in the form of the papers in the 
filing cabinet, a method of storing the papers away and a method of retrieving 
them. These three parts together make up our filing system and together make up 
much more than the separate parts not used together. In addition, if the subject 
of our conversation is not abstract, the collective entity has a limit, it has an 
identifiable boundary such as the filing system for Company C, Institution I , 
Office 0 or Society S within the organisation it serves. 

Another example we could look at is road system. We don't use the phrase in 
isolation, but when communicating about a specific system such as the road system 
of Britain, or of Britain compared with other countries or continents. The system 
of public roads in Great Britain is made up of parts connected into a collective 
entity on the mainland and some near islands, and has a natural boundary formed 
by the sea. If we were having a conversation about the public road system of 
Great Britain as a whole we would be at the scale of motorways and major trunk 
roads and possible accesses to and interlinks between these. If we were 
considering minor roads as well, we would be considering a small area such as the 
public road system of Dorset using the County boundary, or that of Bournemouth 
using the Borough boundary or of Purbeck using a boundary we might choose between 
ourselves at the time of the discussion. 

In this example, then, we have inter-relatedness between the parts of the public 
road system and we have a boundary which we can place where we like to suit the 
purpose of our discussion or study. In this way complex or large systems can 
often be subdivided to facilitate study or discussion. The subdivision would 
usually be a system within its own boundary, but not necessarily having the same 
type of function as the larger system of which it was a part. The system of 
public roads in Bournemouth has the remaining roads in Dorset outside its 
boundary or, what is called in the study of systems, in the environment of the 
Bournemouth system. Similarly, if the boundary is the Dorset County boundary, the 
rest of the roads in mainland Great Britain are part of the environment of the 
Dorset public road system. Taking the main purpose of public roads as being the 
passage of traffic in the broadest sense, the Dorset public road system receives 
traffic from and delivers traffic to its environment, which includes the private 
roads within the County, public and private roads outside the County, the 
seaports and the airports. We have, then, this picture of the Dorset public road 



- 19 - 



system which has the features of inter-related, interdependent elements within a 
boundary and an environment which interacts with the system through the boundary. 

Another example we can take is the motor car or automobile. It has a breaking 
system, a steering system, a suspension system, a fuel system, a cooling system, 
lubrication system, an ignition system, etc... etc... Each of these systems is 
described at great length in the sales and service literature. Not one of these 
is a form of transport on its own, but properly assembled so that they work 
together, these different systems make up an automobile ready to be used by 
driver and passengers on a journey. The whole is much more than a collection of 
separate parts. 

Let us look now at system, or systems, and the world of science. 

For at least centuries past scientists studying nature, the natural scientists, 
have sought to answer the question ""What is life?". "What is this thing called 
life which is so different from what is non-life?" A piece of rock in a pile 
lying on level ground doesn't do anything; in time it will weather and crumble, 
and become indistinguishable from the remains of the other rocks in the pile. An 
old-fashioned wind-up clock ticks away when the mainspring is tightened, but when 
that spring is completely unwound the clock stops; it doesn't re-wind itself. A 
motor car comes to a halt when the last of the petrol in the tank is used up by 
the engine; it doesn't re-fuel itself and start off again, and it doesn't repair 
itself if a fault develops. 

By contrast, a living entity takes from its environment energy in forms like 
food, heat or light and will maintain itself within environmental limits for the 
period of its life. If it is an animal with mobility it will move about in search 
of food or a more suitable environment and, within limits, an injury will heal by 
processes natural to that living animal. Mankind cultivates for food and collects 
for water, invents and manufactures tools, establishes preventive and curative 
medical procedures and introduces rules and laws to regulate relationships 
between individuals and groups. So the key difference between non-life and life 
seems to be this ability to select and take in energy in the form of nutrients, 
heat, light and so on from the environment to maintain the functioning of the 
living entity and enable it in some measure to adapt to changes in the 
environment. 

As an example of this, let us consider the behaviour of yeast in the process of 
making wine. Yeast is a single-celled fungus, dormant when dry, which will feed 
in solutions of sugar and like carbohydrates in water where it will reproduce and 
die leaving its offspring alive and feeding. In the process of feeding, the yeast 
converts sugar to alcohol and, normally, will go on feeding, reproducing and 
dying until either all the sugar has been used up or the alcohol content has 
reached a level of 15-18%. At this level the yeast becomes poisoned by the 
alcohol and dies. This is normal and routine, but some of us who have made wine 
at home will have experienced a phenomenon known as "stopped fermentation" where 
the yeast dies and fermentation ceases even though there is food available to the 
yeast and the alcohol percentage is below the "poison" level. Stopping can happen 
if, for example, the temperature goes too high. 

It is very difficult to re-start fermentation in a stopped wine already partly 
fermented. This is because the yeast put into the sugar and grape juice solution 
to start the fermentation process becomes active in an environment with zero 
alcohol, and it reproduces and completes the life cycle and dies while the 
alcohol level is still low. The first yeast's progeny starts in a low alcohol 
environment, feeds, reproduces and dies in an environment with a slowly rising 
but still comparatively low alcohol environment. The feeding on sugar, 
reproducing and dying cycle repeats and repeats in a rising alcohol level, and a 



- 20 - 



stage is reached at which the alcohol percentage is too high for new yeast to 
survive. This might be only 2% or 3%, but it is very difficult for the amateur to 
breed up yeast to a matching alcohol level to restart a stopped fermentation. 

I don't want to make this a talk about winemaking - but the point of the 
illustration is to describe the existence of this special function which enables 
even a single-cell living vegetable organism to adapt in its own life time and 
through generations to changes in the environment to the extent that it becomes a 
different vegetable from its early ancestor. 

The notion of a number of components acting between themselves in regular or 
understandable ways, and the combination of those components acting together in 
regular or understandable ways to maintain or improve themselves and to perform a 
combined function, was a major force in the development of systems ideas in the 
first half of the century. 

In the 1930's scientists researching in biology, and particularly into the 
chemistry and physical chemistry of cell behaviour, studying 'life' rather than 
'not life", came to the view that living organisms behave like systems or 
combinations of components acting together in a predetermined variety of ways. 
But living organisms behave like systems which are open to their environment, 
which maintain themselves in a continuous exchange of materials with their 
environment and which tend to adapt to changes in that environment. While a 
living biological cell is performing its function, as well as taking in energy to 
perform the function it is taking in energy to maintain itself in functioning 
order. Also, with access to enough of the right sort of energy from the 
environment and in suitable physical conditions, the single cell can replicate or 
reproduce. A cell can improve itself and can create other cells with specialist 
functions, and it can generally exhibit the characteristics of what we call life. 

Scientific research, the development of science, usually follows an iterative 
process of observation, tentative theory, further experiment and observation, 
advancement of theory, still more experiment and observation, and so on. 

In the 1930's, when it came to advancing the scientific study of living cells 
with theory and hard mathematics, there were no theories developed already to 
suit. 

For instance, there are well established theories known as the Laws of 
Thermodynamics which can be used when considering the input, conversion, transfer 
and output of energy in various forms in studies on machinery and other inanimate 
non-life systems. However, these laws and formulae do not apply in studies on 
self-maintaining cells living in and open to an environment to which they were 
continually adjusting themselves. Specifically, for example, the second Law of 
Thermodynamics states that "in any irreversible process, entropy always 
increases". The consumption of energy or food is certainly irreversible. Entropy 
is a scientific term for the disorder or lack of energy or organisation in a 
system such as occurs with the disintegrated rock or the run-down spring. We have 
argued that a living system maintains, heals and repairs itself and can even 
improve itself or its situation and adapt to the environment. In other words, a 
living system can bring about a decrease in entropy, which is not possible 
according to the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Thus, new theories were needed for 
the study of life. 

Much of the work in the 1930's clarifying the lack of adequate existing theory 
and opening up new ideas on living entities as open systems was done by von 
Bertalanffy working in Germany. Considerable advances in developing mathematical 
models and formulae took place in the 1940' s. Much of this work was done by 
Prigogine who developed theories of non-equilibrium thermodynamics which applied 
to open systems living and developing and adapting in an environment. 

- 21 - 



These theories led to the derivation of formulae for fundamental biological 
characteristics and to quantitative laws of biological phenomena with formulae in 
which numbers could be used to test theories and observations. 



Thus, the ideas were being developed and the theories and mathematics taken 
forward to enable researchers to study simple living systems, where entropy or 
disorder could be minimised by a system to achieve its own survival and 
improvement. The development of ideas and theories in this field is still going 
on, and I'd like to illustrate the sort of thing I mean. 

Many of us interested in scientific broadcasts on television will have watched 
the Christmas-time lectures at the Royal Institution, which are said to be for 
children. A leading light in establishing these lectures was Sir George Porter, 
the one time Director of the Royal Institution, a Chemist and Nobel Prize winner. 
I heard a repeat of his "Desert Island Discs" interview on Radio 4 with Sue 
Lawley in which he very briefly described his Nobel prize-winning invention of 
the technique known as flash photolysis, which is the study of the effects of 
light by using a flash of light lasting perhaps only one-millionth of one- 
millionth of a second. When asked what use would be made of the results of such 
experiments, Sir George Porter replied that his special interest was 
photosynthesis and he wanted to know the first things that happen to the cells 
when sunlight hits a leaf, because without photosynthesis there would be no life 
at all as we know it. He saw an understanding of the life process of 
photosynthesis as an essential part of understanding all life processes. 

The concepts of open systems migrated Eastwards into the USSR and Westward as far 
as North America. Scientists in wider fields than plant and animal cell studies 
became interested in an open systems theory which would apply to living, self- 
determining systems as well as inanimate ones. Over the 1950' s these concepts 
came to be better known among the users as General Systems Theory and were 
extended from the biological cell or group of cells to complete organisms and 
organisations. In Britain the Lancaster, City and Open Universities were active 
in systems research, and the U.K. Systems Society was formed. In the U.S., the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Stanford Research Institute, 
amongst others, were centres of study and the Society for General Systems 
Research was founded. 

Systems thinking had arrived. Even the publishers, Penguin, issued a paperback 
book in their Education Series in 1969. 

What has emerged from all this thinking? 

Among other things: 

Just as we have an order in biological classes, so an American scientist Kenneth 
Boulding devised an hierarchy of systems in which he divided the whole of systems 
into levels of different complexities and predictabilities of behaviour. 
Boulding's hierarchy is as follows: 

Level 1. Static structure or framework (a block of wood). 

Level 2. Simple dynamic ( pre-determined, necessary mot ions ; clockwork). 

Level 3. Control mechanism or cybernetic, "thermostat", self-regulating 
(in limited environment). 

Level 4. "Open system" or self-maintaining structure, 'life' rather than 
'non life', "cell". 



Level 5. Genetic-societal level, "plant". 

- 22 - 



Level 6. Animal system - increased mobility, teleological behaviour and 
self-awareness. 

Level 7. Human level - the individual human being considered as a system 
with self-awareness and the ability to utilise language and 
symbol ism. 

Level 8. Social systems, systems of human organisation (messages, value systems 
historical records, art, music, poetry, complex emotions). 

Although Boulding could not describe any system which was better able to survive, 
to learn, to adapt and to influence its environment than systems of human 
organisation, he reasoned that there just might be a level which transcends the 
abilities of his hierarchy level eight. So he added a ninth level. 

Level 9. Transcendental systems - the ultimates, absolutes and inescapable 
unknowables . 

Any system we can think of, and any we cannot yet imagine, can be placed in this 
hierarchy and, for the purpose of description or study, an appropriate level of 
observation or science or art can be brought to bear on the system itself, its 
boundary and its environment. 

Applications of the systems ideas of interconnected, interacting, inter-relating 
components inside a boundary and interacting with the environment have extended 
far from the science of biological cells. As computer systems designs become more 
complicated to serve several types of user through some common central equipment 
and information, so manufacturers like IBM broke down the broad structure of the 
system design into sub-systems which could be designed in detail by smaller teams 
provided that the inter-relationship details were properly specified. The 
aircraft manufacturers Boeing re-organised design work for their large commercial 
aeroplanes into separate sections for such as fuselage, wings and flying 
surfaces, engines and flight controls with a special co-ordinating function 
responsible for precise matching of the interfaces between design groups. 

The special co-ordinating function is analogous to the cell specialisations of 
stem, leaf and petal which develop as a plant grows and improves itself. In the 
Boeing case, co-ordination is a separate internal function; it must cost 
something to run but to Boeing as a whole the cost was judged to be less than 
having high levels of communication between individual designers in different 
groups. This could be called elaboration to achieve better overall performances 
rather than embellishment to beautify. 

Of course, in human activity systems elaborations do not always work as well as 
intended, and need to be re-designed or abandoned, or on the other hand they may 
work so well that the co-ordinated components learn to need less co-ordination or 
regulation, and so part of the elaboration becomes superfluous and, thus, 
embellishment. 

Another use of systems ideas is in the study of human activity systems, or 
organisations, such as local government units and commercial or manufacturing 
enterprises. A study, based on the ideas of systems, seeking to identify those 
procedures and mechanisms which enable the organisation to interact with the 
environment, to respond to changes in the environment or to make changes in the 
environment so that the organisation attempts to survive and improve is known as 
the systems approach. It means studying the activities of individuals and groups 
of people, flows of information or material, performances of machines and 
technology, the use or consumption of resources such as time or money or space 
and, very importantly, the fit or lack of fit between the people in the 



-23 - 



organisation and the jobs they have to do to meet uhe purpose of the 
organisation. Especially, a clear picture needs to be built up of the adaptive 
mechanisms - the way in which the organisation makes the adaptions to changes in 
the environment and makes internal changes where they are needed. 

Once the picture or model of the system has been drawn up and checked, then 
alternatives can be developed and tested against the model to see how well the 
changes would help the organisation to meet new reouirements. The lesson in human 
activity systems is that the requirement placed on the system, how it functions 
in the environment, is always likely to change and will make changing 
requirements on the system components and behaviour. Always there is the need to 
monitor performance and be prepared to make changes to avoid disorder and 
excessive waste and to promote the survival and success of the organisation. 

I would like to think that the great complex system of humanity is, in aggregate, 
acting towards its own survival, and to me that means the survival of our planet 
and all that is good in it. I do think that we, in this Society, are taking a 
part in that process by promoting interest and knowledge in the natural sciences. 



THE 87TH REPORT OF THE COUNCIL FOR 

THE YEAR ENDED 30TH SEPTEMBER, 1990 



INTRODUCTION The year 1989/90 has continued the traditions of the Society by 
Droviding a programme of activities on well established lines but in other ways 
there have been less routine happenings which will be dealt with in this report. 
Due tc a conscientious Finance and General Purposes committee and the full 
support of the Council all the contentious matters have been dealt with to the 
satisfaction of the majority. In a Society such as ours with a membership of 
largely retired people it is to be expected that the changes and developments 
will be well discussed rather than sweeping and the adoption of new policies will 
be the subject of careful consideration before making concessions to outside 
influences . 

PREMISES Our last report featured the dry rot infestation and our worries about 
the cost. The treatment, re-i nstatement and re-decorations were carried out with 
great thoroughness and completed early in the New Year. The cost was over fl2,000 
ana payment would have seriously depleted our reserves but for a fortuitous 
payment on account of the legacy from the estate of the late Mrs B French. 
Without this special help an appeal to members may have been necessary. As it was 
we did receive gifts from some generous members toward the cost. 

Routine maintenance and repairs have this year been kept to a minimum but with 
the good offices of Mr W.H. Arnold a schedule of items needing attention over a 
longer term has been prepared, priorities allocated and subject to funds being 
available the work will be put in hand in the months to come. 

The introduction of new arrangements for the setting of rates on non-domestic 
property has required that the situation of the Society be given careful 
consideration. The new rateable value of 39 Christchurch Road has been set at 
116,800 as compared with the old figure of 11126. The rate would have been 
chargeable at 34.8pence in the f but for the concession to charities of an 80% 
rebate which has been granted by the Local Authority. This, with the introductory 
concessions, has meant that for this year we are paying slightly less rates than 
last. We have also applied to Bournemouth Council for the additional 




- 24 - 



discretionary relief up to 100% but at the time of writing the outcome of our 
application is not known. There are also grounds, we feel, for thinking the new 
assessment is incorrect and an appeal has been lodged with the Inland" Revenue, 
the result of which will not be known for some months. We have been guided in 
these matters by Mr W.H. Lee who, with the other officers, has given a great deal 
of thought to the preparation of our case. We thank Mr Lee for making his 
technical knowledge so freely available to us. 

A surprising number of members seem to need keys to obtain access to the premises 
at times not allowed for in the programme. This became evident when the dry rot 
work was under way and a temporary entrance had to be provided. This has now been 
closed and a latch provided on the main entrance door. Your committee feels that 
the security aspect of a number of members holding keys has to be considered 
since in the event of any incident affecting the security of the premises the 
police would immediately need to know who the key holders were, and our insurers 
would also have views on the subject. As a result, a register of key holders has 
been prepared and all keys signed for. Members are asked to note that no keys 
should be cut without reference to the secretary. 

EQUIPMENT The projection equipment on which we rely so much for the enjoyment of 
our lecture meetings has needed attention this year. The slide projector was out 
of action for some time and we needed to use the old one, our reserve. The 
episcope has given trouble following a bulb failure largely due to dirty storage 
conditions. This has been dealt with by giving the instrument a good clean and 
the provision of a new storage cover. The instrument, though old, should continue 
to be adequate for its purpose and the limited use it gets. It was purchased in 
about 1956 we believe. The Secretary's office has benefited from the gift of a 
Gestetner duplicating machine, which, following a thorough overhaul should solve 
the problem of producing The News Letter and the preparation of various forms to 
assist with the administration of the Society. 

A lot of work has been going on in the Geology room and Mr W.J. Whitsed is 
earning the thanks of the whole Society for the excellent new cabinets, display 
cases and fittings he has made and fitted. 

MUSEUM The museum world has been very active in the past year and the Society has 
experienced some of the spin off. The Museums and Galleries Commission, a 
government Quango, issued its proposals for museum registration covering the 
whole museum movement. The object of the scheme is the improvement of the 
standards of display, conservation, maintenance and public access to all museums. 
The attraction of the scheme is the availability of financial subsidies and 
technical assistance to those museums which put forward acceptable schemes of 
development. The standards are high and the method of allotting help is 
bureaucratic. The whole subject with its effects on the Society was carefully 
considered by the Museum Committee and the Council. They concluded that with our 
method of operation, with honorary section leaders and voluntary helpers and an 
honorary Curator all of whom already devote much of their time to the Society, 
the requirements of registration could not be achieved and it was resolved not to 
seek registration. However the Dorset Museums Association will receive our 
support and we look forward to co-operating with its newly appointed advisory 
officer, Mr Tom Craig. 

Mrs V.E. Copp continues to be very active in the Geology Section and has gathered 
in the support of a number of helpers who spend a lot of time working in the 
section and earn our thanks for their work. The Section has this year had the 
benefit of study visits and a report from Dr. P Crowther of Bristol University 
which is of very great interest and will be of value in the development of the 
collection. Mr H.A. Westrap, a keen archaeologist, has come forward to work on 



- 25 - 



the archaeological collection and we will be learning more of his plans in due 
course. To date he has been undertaking cataloguing and lias arranged for the 
Heywood Sumner frieze to be sent to Bristol for an estimate and a report in 
connection with its restoration. Our thanks to Mr Westrap. 

Changes in the use of rooms are being planned as a preliminary to some re- 
decoration ana to this end the Curator has moved into what was the darkroom. We 
look forward to reporting further on these matters in due course. 

MEETINGS Ihe programme of meetings, lectures, field-meetings, outings and social 
occasions, have followed their well-established pattern and are dealt with in 
detail under the section headings. We must here pay tribute and thank the 
Programme Committee and the Heads of Sections for their consistent effort on 
behalf of the whole membership. The chair has this year been taken by Mrs L.M. 
Maddox assisted by Mrs M.W. Saunders as secretary to whom we are indebted for 
their leadership and the production of the yellow programme. 

We have had our usual series of joint meetings with kindred bodies - The Royal 
Horticultural Society, The Historical Association, The Institute of Biology and 
the National Piers Society - all of which have been well supported and 
successf u 1 . 

The New Year Party, The Garden Party and the Anniversary Tea Party are planned 
and arranged by the Tea and Entertainment Committee led by Mrs M.K. Parkinson and 
they too earn our thanks for very happy occasions. 

The Open Day is planned and arranged by the Museum Committee, chaired by Mrs J. 
George and the Curator, Mr G. Teasdill. It was this year held on a Wednesday. The 
attendance was rather less than in other years as expected, but in spite of some 
differing opinions was considered successful and is to be repeated mid-week next 
year. The fresh layout for the displays this year improved the circulation of the 
visitors and we are grateful to the Curator and the Committee for their efforts. 
The number of applications for membership and enguiries was considered 
sati sf actory. 

MEMBERSHIP The level of membership has continued at about 450 in the past year, 
this is not as many as we would like but we have received a steady flow of 
applications and there have been rather fewer lost to us through non-payment. A 
target of around 500 members is still our objective and we would remind all 
concerned that recommendation is the best method of recruitment and our best 
advertisement. With subscriptions at their present level we are confident that 
the Society offers excellent value in information, entertainment, companionship 
ano friendships. 

The year 1989/90 has regrettably seen the loss of some old and respected members 
through death and these are detailed in the obituaries. Miss D.M. Lowther, surely 
our oldest member joining in 1934, is no longer able to attend our meetings and 
Mrs Chome is now living in a Nursing Home after many years as the Chairman of the 
Garden Committee. Miss Ruth Winter took over the duties of Assistant Secretary on 
the resignation of Mrs B. Hooton-Smith at the onset of her illness. We offer our 
best wishes and thanks to Miss Winter. Miss K.M. Bennetts has had some long 
periods of illness but keeps fighting back bravely, we welcome her support at 
meetings whenever she is able to attend. 

FINANCE The heavy expenditure on repairs and decorations, changes in banking 
practice, and the monthly fluctuations in our affairs have kept the Treasurer and 
his assistant Mrs I Towndrow busy throughout the year. Mr T.P. Whieldon has 
presented his statement month by month and we have always known how we stand. 
Their contribution is invaluable to the Society and we cannot adequately thank 

- 26 - 



them. The fact that Mr Whieldon is our President for the coming year and also 
remains Treasurer shows him to be a 'worker' and we wish him an enjoyable and 
happy year. 

This year the ordinary receipts are up by about 10% but expenditure has increased 
by 30% mainly because of the high cost of repairs. This has produced a deficit of 
ordinary receipts over payments of £6641. We have received f 15, 200 from the 
estate of the late Mrs B. French with a further payment expected on the 
settlement of the estate. This instalment and other extraordinary receipts 
produced a total surplus of 18768. 

Quoted investments have decreased in value due to the state of the economy and 
the financial markets but interest payments from our investments have remained 
high. The incidence of the Community Charge has for the time being lessened our 
Rate Bill but our housekeeper, Mrs Garlinge, has had to bear the increased 
expense personally. This extra expense to her to be born against a small salary 
was considered by us to be unreasonable and we have agreed to make her an extra 
payment. 

Careful thought is being given to the prospects for the coming year and Mr 
Whieldon, assisted by Mr W.H. Lee and Miss R. Winter, will be reporting to us 
early in the new year on the prospects for the subscription and other income when 
set against inflationary trends and rising costs. 

PERSONALIA Mr M.P. Bent ley has been a very active President attending lectures 
and field meetings in addition to making himself available to members and 
visitors. He arranged the highly successful Presidential lunch which was well 
supported and enjoyed. We hope he has enjoyed being our figurehead as much as we 
have appreciated his leadership. 

Tribute has been paid to many members in the course of this report, some have 
perhaps been overlooked, but all members will be aware that the smooth running of 
an active society such as ours depends on many contributions large and small and 
we are grateful for them all, not least to Mrs Garlinge, our housekeeper, and her 
husband who do so much to keep the whole establishment running smoothly. 

TAILPIECE - TUESDAY MORNINGS Before ending this report we would like to make 
special reference to that item which appears in the programme as 'A Working Day 
in the Garden" and to Tuesday mornings. 

Miss M. Blower, Chairman of the Horticulture Section, has gathered an energetic 
group of members to help keep our garden in order and these 'Working Days' are 
the way of focusing attention on the never ending round of jobs required to keep 
the garden up to the high standards we have come to expect. Additional volunteers 
are never turned away. The long period of fine summer weather has enabled a great 
many members to enjoy the peace and beauty which our volunteers achieve. We would 
like Miss Blower and her helpers to know how much we appreciate their work and 
thank them. 

Every Tuesday morning the Society's house really comes alive. The librarian, 
Mr. R. Harwood, and his helpers assemble to keep the library in order, dusting, 
recording, filing, indexing, ordering and checking the books so that all is ready 
to meet the needs of members. The Geology room is opened by Mrs V.t. Copp and 
some of our keenest geologists gather to catalogue and classify our collections 
and Mr W.J. Whitsed is on hand improving the storage and display facilities. The 
reference library is in use for indexing, study and research. Upstairs in the 
Archaeology room Mr H.A. Westrap continues his work of cataloguing and sorting 
our collection. The curator, Mr G. Teasdill, is often to be found busying himself 
with the displays, and the Secretary is about the place to catch someone who 



- 27 - 



cannot be found at any other time. Other members and visitors are around for 
their special purposes. 

With so many busy people about the building and coffee on the go there is 
inevitably lively conversation and discussion revealing an aspect of Society 
membership perhaps not so widely known. Other members may be inclined to join 
in, to follow up a particular interest. All are welcome, however, a preliminary 
enquiry may be helpful in individual cases. 

F.R. Watson, Secretary 



FROM THE CHAIRMAN OF COUNCIL 

As another Society year reaches its close it falls to me to add a few lines to 
the very full account of our activities by our Hon. Secretary Mr R. Watson. As 
usual he mentions the part played by all the officers of the Society except 
himself, whilst he probably works harder than any of us. Thank you once again Mr 
Watson. 

This has been a sad year for me as well as for the Society. We have lost many 
old and valued members who have gone to rest, several of whom had become 
personal friends, amongst them a lady I have always admired, Mrs Hooton-Smith 
whose contribution to the day-to-day running of our Society was immense. Also 
missing now from the Society scene due to failing health is Miss Lowther who at 
one time or another has done sterling work in many different capacities since 
she joined the Society in 1934. I wish all our old members well in their 
adversities and hope their memories of the good times with us sustain them in 
the years to come. 

Finally I appeal to our younger, fitter members to come forward and fill the 
gaps which become more and more frequent, thus maintaining the health and 
reputation we have built up over the years. 

To all members of Council my sincere thanks for their continued support. 

J.G. PARKINSON 



TEA AND ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE 

For members of the above committee 1990 has brought few if any changes. The 
welcome cup of tea after each lecture is still our main concern and I would like 
to take this opportunity to say a big and grateful thank you to all the Ladies 
of the Committee for the way they make my task so easy and pleasurable. 

Our parties during the year have been happy events. It was a great pity on the 
day of the Garden Party, due to the morning being overcast, we had to arrange 
the stalls in the lecture hall. However, by the time the children of the Ballet 
School arrived the clouds had lifted and we were able to enjoy both the beauty 
of the garden and the delightful dancing of the children. Our Birthday Party was 
another enjoyable afternoon if smiling faces and happy chatter were anything to 
go by. 

We look forward to sharing many more such times with you. 



- 28 - 



Mol lie K . Parkinson 
Cha irman 



ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY 



1989 








October 


9 


The French Connection 


Miss M. Stocker B.A. 


November 


11 


A look at the Archaeology of Jordan 


Miss M.W.S . Uavi s 


December 


9 


Moguls and Maharajas 


T. Holden M.A. 


1990 








January 


3 


Christmas Quiz 




February 


7 


Dorset - Some Events in English History 


W.H. Lee 


March 


10 


Art in 5th Century Greece 


Mrs S. Towler M.A. 


Apr i 1 


9 


The Art and History of the Low Countries G. Teasdill F.M.A. 








F.R.S.A. F.R.N.S F.Z.S 


May 


26 


Art and Photography 


N.I. Anderson 


June 


30 


Chaucer's England 


Miss P. Winter M.A. 


July 


21 


Some Lesser Known Glories of Baroque 


Miss M. Stocker B.A. 


August 


8 


Chaucer ' s P i lgrims 


Miss P . Winter M.A. 


August 


13 


Bournemouth's Literary Associations 


G. Teasdi 1 1 F.M.A. 








F.R.S.A. F.R.N.S. F.Z.S. 


September 1 


Bournemouth Piers 


G. Teasdi 11 



The opening lecture of the season was given by the Chairman who gave a broad 
survey of Anglo-French relations from the time of the Gauls, through the wars of 
the 15th and 18th Centuries, to the rapprochement in the 19th Century which 
culminated in the D Day landings. The next two lectures ranged even further 
afield with an up-date of the Archaeology of Jordan, in which Miss Davis gave a 
stimulating account of recent excavations there. The following lecture, a joint 
one with the Historical Association, on Moguls and Maharajas with some 
outstanding illustrations of the glories of Indian architecture, was given by Mr 
Holden, a Vice-President of the Historical Association. 

Keeping up the party spirit, the New Year opened on January 3rd with a Christmas 
Quiz. In February, the Section returned to the serious side of History with a 
lecture by Mr Lee on Dorset - Some events in English History, in which he most 
ably established the close connection between events in national and local 
history. In March, Mrs Towler, an expert in her subject, gave a sensitive lecture 
on Greek Art in the 5th Century thus enabling her audience to appreciate fully 
"The Glory that was Greece". In March there was a welcome return visit by Mr Ian 
Anderson who, still on the subject of Art, illustrated the very close connection 
between art and photography, to the delight of the many photographers in our 
Society. 

In June and early August Miss P. Winter gave two enthralling lectures. The first 
was a vivid description of 14th Century England whilst the second brought to life 
the many diverse characters portrayed by Chaucer. Both lectures were illustrated 
from the Society's collection of lantern slides. In the interim month of July the 
Chairman gave a lecture centred on the magnificent religious buildings of 
Provincial Austria and Bavaria. 

The last lectures of the season by Mr Teasdill were a small contribution to 
Bournemouth's Centenary Celebrations. With his unique knowledge, of Bournemouth's 
history he contributed a lecture on Bournemouth's literary associations centred 
on the poet Shelley and the ever popular Robert Louis Stevenson. 

This lecture set a precedent for the Society as it was the first lecture to be 
held in the garden with a radio link to the hall for the benefit of those not 



- 29 - 



wishing to be outside. The second lecture on Bournemouth's Piers was a joint 
meeting with the National Piers Society. 

The Archaeology Museum 

The Chairman is delighted to announce that Mr H.R. Westrap has now taken over 
responsibility for the Museum. He has already shown his enthusiasm by compiling a 
detailed Catalogue of its contents which will be placed in the library for the 
use of members. Another piece of good news is that the Museum is soon to be re- 
decorated. Information is already being sought as to the best method of 
conserving the unique Heyward Sumner frieze, the work of the famous 
archaeologist, who was President of B.N.S.S. from 1926-8. 

Margaret Stocker 
Cha irman 

With the fine example set by the geological section, it is intended to begin with 
a similar format to list separately the archaeological collection beginning with 
the Grenfell/Mc Dougall funerary objects permanently on display. There are, 
according to the accession register, 187 items that require further 
identification to create a new numerical index. A recent visit by Dr G. de Knegt, 
an Egyptologist who is studying museum collections in this country, has pointed 
out items of particular interest including Nhagada 1 and Nhagada 2 early Egyptian 
pottery and pal lettes belonging to the same period, Members are invited to assist 
this identification process so that the rest of the archaeological collection can 
be dealt with in a similar manner. 

T. Westrap 



ASTRONOMY 



1989 








October 


7 


The Phases of the Moon 


Colin Pither 


November 


25 


A Photographic Treasure Trove Part 2 


Andrew Chisholm 


December 


23 


Cosmology 


Grahame Bamwel 1 B.Sc. 


1990 








February 


17 


Time, the Earth, Moon and Sun 


Graeme Nash M.A. F.R.A 


March 


24 


Gravitational Wave Astronomy 


Dr. Charles Boyle 


Apri 1 


21 


Voyager II Klyby of Neptune 


Andrew Chisholm 



In the first lecture of the season, Colin Pither, an experienced lunar observer, 
discussed how the Phase of the Moon came about - the changing aspect of the 
hemisphere of the moon illuminated by the sun as viewed from the earth during the 
course of one lunar orbit, the month. Although the moon keeps the same face to 
the earth, its elliptical orbit and axis "tilt" introduce some east/west and 
north/south libration respectively enabling more than half the moon to be seen 
from the earth over a period of years. During the month, the different aspect of 
solar lighting of the lunar features produces dramatic changes in the appearance 
of any object (e.g. crater). Colin illustrated this clearly with a model in the 
lecture hall. 

The treasure trove in Andrew Chisholm's lecture was the 500 plus 3 inch square 
glass astronomy slides belonging to the Society, mostly of photographs plus some 
drawings made between 1870 and 1930. 



- 30 - 



The Part I lecture in March had considered solar system objects. The Part II 
lecture considered sidereal objects, stars, galaxies etc. Andrew showed some 
beautiful slides of the Milky Way and other stellar systems as well as nebulae 
such as M42 in Orion. Comparisons with modern photographs were made. Of 
particular interest was a slide of the Crab Nebula, Ml. The society slide taken 
in the 1890' s compared with a modern photograph showed that the object had 
definitely expanded over the period of years. 

The lecture of Grahame Barnwell was in keeping with two earlier lectures which 
marked the centenary of the birth of Edwin Hubble, the great American observer 
and father of modern Cosmology. Grahame presented a clear and thought-provoking 
summary of our modern ideas of the birth, structure and evolution of the cosmos. 

The Section Chairman gave the first lecture of 1990. He explained how throughout 
human history the concept of time was based on two astronomical units - the mean 
rotation period of the earth compared to the sun - the solar day; and the 
"seasonal" orbit of the earth about the sun - the tropical year. The history of 
the calendar is the history of the reconciliation of these two basic, but 
unrelated units of time. In the West, the "phase" period of the moon about the 
earth - the synodic month - is less important but is the basis of the Jewish and 
Islamic calendars. In the West, the "month" is used to date Easter only. However, 
the tidal effect of the moon (and to a lesser extent the sun) is responsible tor 
slowing down the rotation of the Earth, thus lengthening the day. In recent times 
the rotation of the Earth is no longer used to define time - "atomic" clocks are 
more accurate. 

The lecture by Dr Charles Boyle was on a new branch of observational astronomy 
based on the predictions of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, that 
accelerating masses emit ghostly gravitational waves, ripples in space-time that 
travel out at the speed of light. Such waves in theory can be detected by tiny 
geometrical changes to sensitive apparatus on Earth. The effect is incredibly 
small even from such violent cosmological events as an asymmetric supernova 
explosion. Glasgow University, where Charles was a graduate, is one of the few 
pioneers in the field of building gravitational wave detectors. Laser 
interferometer detectors are being developed. Elsewhere, huge suspended aluminium 
cylinders provide the detector. So far, no gravitational waves have definitely 
been observed by any earth based apparatus although development of techniques 
promise success in the near future. Indirect evidence is available from the 
study, by radio astronomers, of the "decay" of the orbit of a binary pulsar. 
Clearly the field of gravitational wave astronomy is in its infancy and promises 
an exciting future. 

The subject of Andrew Chisholm's lecture was the flyby of the Neptune planetary 
system by the NASA spacecraft Voyager II on August 24/25 1989. Andrew has already 
lectured on this amazing craft's encounter with Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. 
Neptune was the last planetary "port of call" after a journey of 12 years over 
some four thousand million miles. Voyager II took many wonderful photographs 
which showed Neptune to be a meteorologically active world with a tilted magnetic 
field (like Uranus). Just as interesting was the major moon Triton which orbits 
Neptune the "wrong way round". This proved to be a bitterly cold world with a 
bewildering variety of surface features including active Nitrogen emitting 
volcanos. Andrew opined that here we were seeing a "twin" of the, as yet, 
unvisited (and presently less remote) planet Pluto. Voyager II continues to 
plunge, at lOmps, into deep space still able to contact Earth and still able to 
provide useful information (on the magnetopause and possibly planet X) until 
about 2020. Surely this craft must rate as one of the greatest achievements of 
20th century astronomy. 

Graeme Nash 
Cha irman 

- 31 - 



BOTANY 



Study Session 








1989 










December 


14 


Fungi 


Mrs A. 


Leonard 


Lectures 










1989 










November 


8 


Badbury Rings 


The Warden, Mr D Smith 


1990 










January 


20 


Wild Orchids of Dorset 


Mr M. Jenkinson 


February 


28 


Australia - Flowers, etc. 


Miss Bowen 


March 


31 


"Say it with Flowers" 


Mr K. Harrison 


Apri 1 


28 


Brownsea Island 


Mr K. Cook, Warden of the 








D.T.N.C 


. reserve 


May 


9 


Chalk Streams 


Dr. M. 


Ladle Ph.D. 


June 


11 


Avon Forest 


The Warden, Mr G. Le Pard 








B.Sc, 


F.R.E.S. 


September 


12 


Orchids 


Dr. T. 


Norman 


October 


8 


Fungal Medley 


Mr R. Collings 


Field Meetings 








1989 










November 


14 


Fungus Foray on Barrow Moor 


Mrs A. 


Leonard 


1990 










March 


2 


Braemore for Snowdrops 


Miss M. 


Blower 


March 


29 


Holt Heath 


Mrs. M. 


Saunders 


Apri 1 


12 


Pamph i 1 1 


Mrs. M. 


Saunders 


May 


11 


Worth Matravers and Seacombe 


Miss S. 


Mackintosh 


May 


16 


Spinners Garden & Exbury 






June 


8 


Corfe Common 


Miss S. 


Mackintosh 


June 


22 


Martin Down 


Miss S. 


Mackintosh 


June 


28 


River Walk at Wareham & Visit to East 


Mrs. M. 


Saunders 






Stoke Freshwater Ecology Institute 






July 


6 


Durlston Head 


Mrs. A. 


Leonard 


July 


12 


Coward's Marsh 


Mrs. M. 


Evelyn 


Ju ly 


18 


Sop ley Common & Moors River 


Mrs. M. 


Saunders 


August 


1 


Cadman's Pool 


Miss S. 


Mackintosh 


August 


10 


Ladycross Lodge 


Mrs. A. 


Leonard 


August 


21 


Red Rise Area 


Mr J.G. 


Parkinson 


September 


7 


Holt Heath 


Miss S. 


Mackintosh 


September 27 


Denny Wood Fungi 


Mr R.G. 


Lees 


October 


11 


Gritnam Wood Fungi 


Mr R. Col lings 



Our November lecture was by the Warden of Badbury Rings, Mr David Smith, who told 
us about the history of the area witn some very interesting aerial slides, as 
well as about its plants. Also in November Mrs Ann Leonard led us on a fungus 
foray in the Barrow Moor area, then in December she used blackboard diagrams as 
well as real fungi to help the less knowledgeable of us to identify the different 
species . 

- 32 - 

i 



In January, we should have had Mr and Mrs Parish, but sadly the former died 
during Christmas week. Their shows have given much pleasure to many people and he 
will be greatly missed. Our substitute speaker was Mr Martin Jenkinson whose 
enthusiasm for wild orchids and the necessity to conserve their habitat kept him 
talking for more than the allotted hour, but no one left before he finished. In 
February , Miss Bowen showed us sunny slides taken in Australia, and at the 
beginning of March we enjoyed real sun on our first field trip, to Breamore, 
where we saw snowdrops, primroses and violets, among other flowers. At the end of 
March, in Uddens Park and Holt Heath, we found more plants blooming; and Mr Ken 
Harrison cheered us up with his show"Say it with Flowers". 

On our field trips in April there was much more to see, including 
Toothwort (LATHRAEA SQU ARMARIA) and early purple orchid (ORCHIS MASCULA). Our 
April lecture was by Mr Kevin Cook, Warden of the D.T.N.C. Reserve on Brownsea 
Island, who told us about its past as well as its present. In May, Or. Mike 
Ladle from East Stoke Freshwater Ecology Institute used diagrammatic as well as 
pictorial slides to make the more technical bits understandable to the less 
scientific among us. We saw some of it when we visited the Institute on June 
28th. On our trip to Seacombe we found neither spider nor frog orchids but some 
of us enjoyed lying in the warm sun after lunch while an energetic few climbed 
the cliff path and returned. 

The outing to Spinners Garden and Exbury in cars made a restful change. In June, 
on Corfe Common, the poor weather conditions became worse soon after lunch and we 
returned to the cars but we had noted 65 species in bloom, including changing 
forgetmenot (MYOSOTIS DISCOLOR). On the 11th Mr Gordon Le Pard, the warden, gave 
us an interesting talk about the Avon Forest. On Martin Down on 22nd June heavy 
showers of wind-blown rain divided our party after lunch but we noted 79 species 
including common spotted orchid ( DACTYLORCHIZA FUSCHSII), fragrant orchid 
(GYMNADENIA CONOPSEA), bastard toad flax (THESIUM HUMIFUSUW) and knapweed 
broomrape ( OROBANCHE ELATOR) some of the last being unusually tall. On 28th June, 
though our walk along the river at West Mills was for less than two hours, we 
still managed to find 70 species in bloom. After lunch we went to the East Stoke 
Water Institute. 

By 6th July, on our trip to Durlston Head, we were glad to find shade at 
lunchtime. We found the uncommon Durlston Head variety of centaury, and spent a 
considerable time searching unsuccessfully in the grass for pheasant's eye 
(ADONIS ANNUA) in an unfertilised field which had been seeded with some of the 
flowers which used to grow in natural profusion:- corn cockle (AGROSTEMMA 
GITHAGO), cornflower ( CENTAUREA CYANUS) and corn marigold (CHRYSANTHEMUM SEGETUM) 
and others. On the following week we again welcomed the shade at lunch time on 
our trip to Coward's Marsh. Some of us had not been there before, and so found 
this venue extra interesting, and we were all delighted to see so many marsh 
cinquefort (POTENTILLA PALUSTRIS) in the grass though much of the marsh was drier 
than usual. On Sopley Common and the Troublefield Reserve 68 species were noted 
including 2 sunden ( DROSERA INTERMEDIA and D. ROTUNDIFOLIA) . 

By August 1st many of us had had enough of walking in the sun and were glad to 
eat lunch near the cars, overlooking Cadman's Pool, and in the afternoon three 
members wisely stayed there while others envied three grass snakes which were 
seen happily keeping cool in one of the few pools left in the bed of the stream. 
Nearly every bog asphodel ( NARTHEC I UM OSSIFRAGUM) had withered since the previous 
week and much of the usually marshy ground was dry. At Ladycross Lodge on the 
10th, 55 species were noted including lesser water pla'ntain (BALDELLIA 
RANUNCULOIDES) , and in the Red Rise area, on the 21st, more than 49, though the 
effects of the continuing hot, dry weather were obvious. On September 7th on Holt 
Heath, the Warden, Mr Ian Nicol helped us to find the marsh gentians (GENTIANA 
PNEUMONANTHE), the 3 varieties of gorse (ULEX EUROPAEUS, U. GALLI and U. MINOR) 
and both sundews (D. ROTUNDIFOLIA and D. INTERMEDIA) 

- 33 - 



On the 27th Mr Bob Lees took us on the first fungus foray of the year, in Denny 
Wood where, because of the drought fewer species were found than normal. This was 
also the case two weeks later in Gritnam Wood when Mr Ray Col lings led us. 

I am most grateful to those who have led Botany Walks and to Mrs Molly Saunders 
for extra noting of "finds". Thanks are due also to those who suggest names of 
speakers, and to Mr Graham Wilson, projectionist. 

One of our members, Mrs Mary Sparkes, noticed and collected an unusual grass 
growing in Southbourne where building works were to begin. It has now been 
identified as DIGITARIA SANGUINALIS (hairy finger grass) by Mr S.A. Renvoize the 
Head of Grass Section in the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, who has kept a 
specimen to add to their collection. Our sample with more information, may be 
seen on application to Mrs Sparkes, Miss Mackintosh or Miss Blower. 

Shei la M. Macki ntosh 
Cha irman 

GEOGRAPHY 



Lectures 








1989 








October 


11 


Egypt 


Peter Down M.A. 


November 


29 


Iceland - Its Volcanoes & Glaciers 


Miss J. Watford M.A. 


December 


13 


The Norwegian Coast 


Miss E. Oldfield 


1990 








January 


13 


Scenery of China 


Miss M.W.S. Davis 


February 


21 


Over the hills and not so far away in 


Mrs M. Arnold 






Dorset. 




March 


21 


National Parks of the Mid-West U.S.A. 


Mrs C. O'Shea B.Sc, 








M. Biol. Sc. 


Apri 1 


18 


Water in Africa 


J. Elgood M.A. 


May 


12 


Rivers and Bridges Worldwide 


K . Eames F.C.A. 


June 


2 


Around the Mediterranean 


The President 


July 


28 


Land of the Pharaohs 


Miss J. Watford M.A. 


August 


22 


Tenerife 


W.J. Whitsed F.R.S.A. 


September 


8 


Wandering in South-East Asia 


W.H. Lee 


Field Meetings 






1989 








October 


13 


Corfe Castle - Kingston area 


Miss Davis/Mrs Lund 


1990 








January 


25 


Talbot Heath - Pugs Hole - Coy Pond 


Miss Davis/Mrs Saunders 


February 


13 


Bloxworth - Woodbury Hill 




March 


8 


Cranborne - Boveridge - Burwood 




Apri 1 


26 


The Frome at Moreton 




May 


22 


Roman Villa, Bignor and Leonardslee 


Miss Davis and Mrs Lund 






Gardens . 




Ju ly 


26 


Mapperton House and Gardens 


Miss Davis and Mrs Lund 



October saw a change in the published programme when Mr P. Down stepped in to 
give a tine illustrated lecture on Egypt as Mr Elgood was indisposed. Lectures in 
November and December provided a contrast although both were in Northern Europe, 
Miss J. Watford described how lakes in Iceland were formed when the pressure 
below the surface becomes so great that an explosion takes place, black basalt 
rocks are thrown up and the depression fills with water to form a lake. Miss 
Oldfield illustrated a journey by Norwegian coastal steamer from the old 
Hanseat ic 

- 34 - 



port of Bergen to Kirkenes on the Russian border and the return. The steamers run 
every day covering 2500 nautical miles and calling at 36 ports. 

The scenery of China was the Chairman's subject in January. Ihe pictures showed 
the gorges of the Yangtse river and the curious limestone pinnacles which stand 
up in the countryside in the vicinity of the I. i river in the South-East. 

In February Mrs Arnold showed pictures of Dorset, including the little church at 
]drrant Crawford where Richard Poore was baptized. He became Bishop ot Salisbury 
and started the building of the great Cathedral. Queen Joan of Scotland, sister 
of King John, who founded an abbey nearby is also buried in the church. 

Mrs O'Shea's journey through Yellowstone and Yosemite Parks in the U.S.A. showed 
us pictures of mountains, hot geysers and caves in which an ancient tribe of 
Indians lived. 

Mr Elgood told us of the problems of water distribution in Africa, some parts 
have access to irrigation from rivers but others suffer from drought. Ihe water 
hyacinth, though visually attractive, is a menace because it clogs the water 
channels. There were fine pictures of a rainbow over Victoria Falls. 

Two projectors were used by Mr tames, one to show captions and the other pictures 
of Bridges and Rivers world-wide. The Golden gate bridge in San Francisco and the 
Lion Bridge at Vancouver showed to advantage in these fine photographs. 

Our President this year, Mr Bent ley, who has lived abroad for many years took us 
on an interesting tour around the Mediterranean calling at Venice, Israel and 
some Greek islands. My thanks go to Miss Watford who stepped in at short notice 
to give a talk on the "Land of the Pharaohs". Egypt is a country that changes 
through the eyes of different people. 

Mr Whitsed visited Tenerife several years ago and showed some fine pictures of 
flowers and the Baranco del Inferno, a huge canyon with stretches of beautiful 
scenery. A waterfall at the end of the gorge, plunges down a cliff into a small 
lake. Mr Lee, in his lecture, showed us pictures of the causeway at Singapore 
along which the Japanese attacked in the Second World War. He explained the 
method of collecting the liauid from rubber trees and showed us a wealth of 
temples and palaces in Bangkok. 

Sadly, in July, Philip Hopkins died suddenly. He had been a member of the Society 
since 1981 and was a regular lecturer for this section. Although retired, he 
still was interested in adult education and took classes in the geography of 
Dorset. Philip will be greatly missed by all his friends. 

Field Meetings 

The October meeting took us across Corfe Common to Kingston where we looked down 
on Encombe House tucked into a fold of the Purbecks. In January the walk through 
Pugs Hole and Talbot Heath was the day of the "great storm". Nine members had the 
cobwebs b lown away! . 

A small group walked through the woods to Woodbury Hill, the hill fort where the 
old fair was held. This was in February and we had good views of the countryside 
around Bere Regis. Our walk on a spring day in March took us along the edge of 
hills from Cranborne, down to the valley and return along by the stream. Flowers 
and birds, including the blackcap, were seen on our return visit to the F rome at 
Moreton . 

A full coach of members visited the Roman Villa at Bignor which contains some of 
the finest mosaics in England. Later we visited the well-known gardens at 
Leonardslee, owned by the Loder family, containing specie rhododendrons and 

- 35 - 



azaleas. Mapperton House and Gardens, the home of Mr and Mrs John Montagu, was 
opened by appointment for us in July. It is a Tudor Manor house set in terraced 

gardens . 

Finally to everyone who has contributed to this successful year in whatever 
capacity - my grateful thanks. 

M.W.S. Davis 
Cha irman 

GEOLOGY 



Lectures 
1989 



October 


27 


Living in the Past 


Justin Delair, B.Sc. 


November 


11 


Coast of Britain 


Vince May, M.Sc. 


1990 








January 


10 


A Mechanical Engineer's View of 


Frank Behennah, C.Eng. , 






Geology 


F.R.Ae.S . , F. I.M.E. , 








F.I.Q.A., F.B.I.S. 


February 


14 


Si 1 ver 


Harry Payne, F.G.A. 


March 


12 


Geology and You 


Hugh Prudden, M.A. 


Apri 1 


4 


Wanderings in England 


Tony Cross, B.Sc. , F.G.S . 








A.M. A. 


May 


23 


Darwin and Evolution, Geology and 


Graham Teasdi 1 1 , F.M.A. 






Genesis 


F.R.S.A., F.R.N.S., 








F.Z.S. 


June 


16 


Scenery and Geology of the Isle of 


Lt. Cdr. Charles Jackson 






Ang lesey 


B.A., C.Eng., M.I.E.R.E. 








R.N. Rtd. 


July 


4 


The Dorset Coast 


Geoff Poole, M.A., 








A.M.I.E.E., A.R.P.S. 


August 


29 


Planetary Geology 


Frank Behennah, C.Eng., 








F.R.Ae.S., F. I.M.E. 








F.I.Q.A., F.B.I.S. 


September 


26 


Wonders of Geology under the Microscope 


Keith Abineri, B.Sc, 








M.R.S.C., C.Chem. 


Field Meetings 






1989 








October 


3 


Bristol Museum for Great Sea Dragon 


Leader: Mrs V.E. Copp and 






Exh ibi tion 


Dr. P. Crowther. 


March 


20 


Geology around Abbotsbury 


Leader: Mr F. Behennah 


Apri 1 


17 


Lyme Regis 


Leader: Mrs V.E. Copp 


May 


29 


Hengistbury Head 


Leader: Mrs V.E. Copp 


June 


29 


The F leet, Wyke Regis 


Leader: Mr F. Behennah 


Ju ly 


27 


Chilcomb House, Headquarters of the 


Leader: Mr T. Cross 






Hampshire Museum Service 




August 


9 


Bindon Hill, Fossil Forest and 


Leader: Mrs M. Saunders 






Mupe Bay 




September 


6 


Ball Clay Geology, E.C.C. pit near 


Leader: Mr Q.G. Palmer 






Wareham 




Study groups 






1989 








November 


16 


Using Microscopes 


Mr F. Behennah 


1990 








January 


16 


Lower Palaeozoic Rocks and Fossils 


Mr A. Osborn and 








Mrs V. Copp 


February 


6 


Mesozoic and Fossi Is 


Mrs A. Osborn and 



Mrs V. Copp 

- 36 - 



The past year has been particularly enjoyable as so many members have taken part 
in the successful running of the section. Lectures, field trips and study groups 
have been organised by Keith Abineri, Frank Behennah, Alec Osborn, Molly Saunders 
and Graham Teasdill, and I am very grateful to them for the time, thought and 
detailed care they devoted to the work. I hope they felt rewarded by the obvious 
appreciation of the members. Valuable help was given behind the scenes by Lillian 
Rowe and Gwen O'Dell and recently we have been very happy to welcome Sheila 
Aitken, Ginger Hall and Jack Slater to the team of museum workers. 

Josephine Zara is compiling a bibliography of geological information relative to 
the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch area. When this is finished (in a few 
years" time) it will be a valuable addition to our resources. We possess a good 
wide representative collection of local geological specimens and it seems 
desirable that we should also have a source of reference for information relating 
to local geology. Josephine's research has already proved useful in uncovering 
information on the history of some of our holdings. 

Alec Osborn has spent two years on the mineral collection and has now begun to 
classify the rock specimens. His specialised knowledge has made a great 
improvement in the cataloguing and presentation of our mineral collection. We are 
very grateful to him for the help he has so generously given to the geology 
section . 

As reported in previous years Justin Delair has continued to travel down from 
Oxford about once a month to catalogue the fossil collection. He has now been 
working on the collection for about five years and during that time has 
identified, organised and systematically catalogued over 15,000 specimens. There 
is, however, still a long way to go. The Society is greatly indebted to him for 
his dedication to this invaluable work. 

Gerry Mouat's collection, the bequest of which was mentioned in the last 
Proceedings, proved to be surprisingly large and rich with regard to genera and 
species it contained. There were over 4,000 specimens which have now been 
identified, checked and catalogued by Julian Delair. Gerry Mouat had spent a 
lifetime collecting fossils locally. As well as collecting from well-known 
f ossi lif erous localities such as Lyme Regis, Charmouth, Kimmeridge Bay, Wyke 
Regis, Barton, etc., he also obtained fossils from certain localities such as Rye 
Water at Corscombe and Avon Water at Holmsley where their existence had not 
apparently been previously recorded, either in the literature or in other 
museums' collections. Although the fossils concerned are not uncommon in the same 
horizons elsewhere their geographical range has thus been significantly extended. 

Through the good offices of Graham Teasdill we were able to secure four handsome 
display cabinets from Russell Cotes Museum. These were surplus to their 
requirements and were given to us on permanent loan. We were thus able to show 
our specimens in the geology room to better advantage on Open Day in September. 
Bill Arnold carried out some constructional alteration work in the room to make 
more storage space. Bill Whitsed made some useful wall cases and reorganised 
cupboards to streamline the layout of the room. He also made a set of drawers to 
fit underneath one of the new cabinets so that we were able to house the Gerry 
Mouat collection quite comfortably. We are very grateful indeed for all this 
help . 

We have had visits during the year from the Geology section of the Dorset Natural 
History and Archaeological Society, the Open University Geology Section, the 
University of the Third Age and from Adult Education Classes. Visits have also 
been made by interested individuals including a professor from New Zealand and 
various researchers on subjects such as Tertiary nautiloids, dinosaur diseases 
and meteorites. It is good to know that the Society's Geology collection is 
serving a useful scientific purpose. 

- 37 - 



Perhaps the most important event of the year was a survey of the collection made 
by Dr. Peter Crowther of Bristol Museum on behalf of the South West Area Museum 
Council, of which the Society is a member. The survey was sought so that 
professional advice could be obtained on the present state and storage conditions 
of the collection and its future curation. The report was very thorough and 
comprehensive, running to a hundred pages, and its recommendations were most 
helpful. It was also an interesting piece of work as, from documents we have 
available in our library, Dr. Crowther was able to build up a history of the 
acquisitions setting them against a background of the general history of the 
Society. A copy of this valuable and well-produced report has been placed in the 
Society's library for reference. 

Vera E. Copp 
Cha irman 

HORTICULTURE 



Lecture 
1990 

February 24 The Fragrant Garden Mrs K. Sanecki F.L.S. 

Visits 

May 31 Wi s ley 

September 14 Hillier's Arboretum 

Another year when gale force winds wrecked many southern gardens, we suffered 
most from salt borne inward to scorch and burn our evergreen trees. A dry summer 
followed and several shrubs succumbed and others only managed a very short 
flowering season. 

The garden was open to the public in National Conservation of Plants and Gardens 
Week. This was a pleasant day and many gardeners from Kew visited. 

Elaeagnus pungus and Eriobotrya japonica (loquat) have strongly fragrant flowers 
in the autumn and this year were followed by fruits which is most unusual in 
Britain. Catalpa aurea (Indian bean tree) which has not flowered for two years 
did so this summer but failed to produce seed pods. The Ceanothus have been 
wonderful and Amaryllis belladonna has never looked so well. 

The new Hydrangeas were very small when they were badly mauled by someone who 
came armed for the attack. What a pity others were not allowed the pleasure of 
seeing them. 

The pool still creates interest and we have extended the low growing plants to 
aid frogs in their first hop to safety on dry ground. 

The installing of a tap at the lower end of the garden was a long overdue 
improvement. My grateful thanks to the member who sent some young men to dig a 
trench. The teak seats and benches have been made stable and safe to use. New 
labels are clear and easy to read but do snap off if trodden on; I am sorry that 
there are no English names for some plants. 

Changes always take place in a garden and "39" is no different. Trees and shrubs 
need food, water and light and we endeavour to maintain some degree of balance. I 
am fortunate in having a team with whom to discuss these and other problems. Mr 
W. Arnold gives his time freely to sort out boundary problems, drainage etc. and 
I am always in his debt. 

Mary Blower 
Chairman 

- 38 - 



PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 

1989 





18 




Don nf Rritich Cac 






n+ flac Main 1 aw inn 
Ul UOj no 1 II L Ojr 1 1 1 y 


OUU Lllcr II rvtry lull 


1990 








March 


17 


Voyagers among the Planets 


Prof. P.G. Farrel 


June 


6 


Pills and Potions 


J. Calvert B.Sc. 


June 


23 


Chemistry Ancient and Modern 


Rev. F.W. King 








Miss E.B. Wood B.Sc 


Ju ly 


16 


Lord Kelvin 


F.R. Watson 


September 


29 


Energy and Nuclear Power 


W.R. Turk 



Encouraged by some suggestions from the Secretary in last year's Proceedings, an 
overall theme was in mind for this section this year - "Modern Advances in 
Science, in the light of Earlier Pioneering". An outline of this idea was given 
by the Chairman, with the stress on the need for a constant observance of the 
Scientific Method and an open mind. Miss E.B. Wood illustrated this in a short 
account of her experiences as Head of Chemistry Department of the Girls' Grammar 
School and of notes of a lecture she gave to the Society in 1952 about the Curies 
and the Atom. 

A member of the Pharmaceutical Society, Rev. J. Calvert talked about "Pills and 
Potions" (past and present). Mr F.R. Watson gave a lecture on Lord Kelvin; and 
there has been a visit by Mr W.R. Turk, of Winfrith, who spoke about "Energy and 
Nuclear Power". In March, a lecture given by Professor P.G. Farrel 1 of the 
University of Manchester was on "Voyagers among the Planets". This was chaired by 
M.P. Bent ley, the President of the Society in 1990. 

It is recognised that the various sections of the Society are for the interest, 
information and enjoyment of the Members. Accordingly, the Chairman of Physics 
and Chemistry would be very grateful to know what would be of the most interest 
to the largest number of people in this section. Efforts are being made to 
present subjects of topical and popular appeal. It is hoped that members with 
specific knowledge and skills will be ready to share these with us all. 

The Open Day had some representation from this Section. Some of the elements and 
minerals belonging to the Society were on display, as were the notes and diagrams 
of Miss Wood's lecture and other items of interest. We were very grateful to Mr 
J. P. Downes for exhibiting some of his apparatus and very interesting matters 
relating to Wireless and Radio Communications. 

F.W. King 
Cha irman 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



1989 








October 


28 


Jewels of Nature 


D.J. Marchant 


November 


13 


Waterways: Camera Afloat 


J. Andrews 


December 


16 


Focus on Gardens 


Mrs G. Obee 


1990 








January 


15 


In the Mind's Eye 


Miss M. Exton 


February 


19 


Photographing the Night Sky 


B . M i z om 


March 


19 


Glimpses of the Middle East 


G.J. Jefferson F.R 


Apri 1 


7 


Audio-Visual: As I See it 


J. Loader L.R.P.S. 



- 39 - 



May 14 

July 14 

August 18 

September 19 



Audio-Visual: East Side Story Mrs M. Bright L.R.P.S. 

Audio-Visual: With Colour in My Camera G. Hawkins A.R.P.S. 

Close-up, The Easy Way R. Fortt 

Lantern Slides: Old Bournemouth F.R.Watson 



Good friends have once again contributed an interesting programme of special 
photographic interest. Mr Marchant revealed through macro-photography the 
jewelled colours in nature: breathtaking views of small creatures from a distance 
of a few inches. Mr Andrews gave us a personal travelogue afloat on waterways 
with memorable views, while Miss Exton once more thrilled us with her seeing eye 
and camera dexterity displaying beauty in the simple things around us. 

Mr Mizom introduced us to the art of night-sky photography using simple apparatus 
(plus interrupted sleep, cold hands and feet). Mr Jefferson illustrated a 
whirlwind tour of Cyprus, Israel and Jordan. Mrs Bright delighted us with a 
spectacular presentation of a journey from Quebec, embracing Niagara Falls, to 
the Everglade Swamps - a superb combination of sight and sound. 

Once again Mr Loder produced a most enjoyable programme, this time including 
Children's Murals at Bath, the Dorset Steam Fair, R.H.S. Roses, and a special 
Lake District Selection. Mr Hawkins, another good friend from the Bournemouth 
Photographic Society, inspired us with sequences of professional photography 
accompanied by music which never intruded, but enhanced the sheer beauty of 
varied scenes. 

I missed Mr Fortt 's exposition on close-up photography but have been told how 
much it was appreciated. Bournemouth's centenary year was fittingly illustrated 
by Mr Watson's selection of the Society's lantern slides of Old Bournemouth which 
he described in detail. 

I thank the Projectionists who work so hard in the programme's production. 

Grace E. Obee 
Chairman 



ZOOLOGY - ENTOMOLOGY 



Lectures 
1989 

October 



23 



Conservation of the Large Blue 



J. A. Thomas 

M.A., Ph.D., F.R.E.S. 

Miss M.M. Brooks 

Ph.C.,M.R. Pharm.S., 

F.R.E.S. 



December 



2 



Migrant Butterflies & Moths 



1990 

January 



24 



Moths of Hedgerows & Marshy Places 



Miss M.M. Brooks Ph.C, 
M.R. Pharm.S., F.R.E.S. 
Dr. K. Mash 
B.Sc, Ph.D., M.A. 



February 



10 



Damsels and Dragons 



Field Meetings 
1990 



May 24 

June 15 

July 5 

July 20 

August 7 



Martin Down 
Holt Heath 
Crockford Bridge 
Vernditch Chase 
Sop ley Common, Hurn 



Miss M.M. Brooks 

Miss M.M. Brooks 

Miss M.M. Brooks 

Miss M.M. Brooks 

Miss M.M. Brooks 



- 40 - 



A fine summer has resulted in early records for several species of Lepidoptera; 
like last year, the Dark Green Fritillary (A. aglaja) was on the wing at the end 
of May. Exceptional numbers of Holly Blues (C.argiolus) were seen throughout the 
district, and there were numerous reports of Clouded Yellows (C. croceus). 
Several species of migrant Hawk-moths were recorded; a Humming-bird Hawk-moth (M. 
stel latarum) laid eggs on the flower-buds of Red Valerian in my own garden. 

This year's field meetings enjoyed good weather with one exception - the 
Crockford meeting was conducted in gale-force winds which effectively pinned all 
insects to the ground. A good number of Silver-studded Blues (P. argus) were 
seen, but dragonflies remained hidden. The highlight of the Vernditch meeting was 
the sighting of several valezina form of the female Silver-washed Fritillary (A. 
paphia). The two moth trappings were very successful, producing a total of over 
200 moths, covering 62 species. 

Dr. Jeremy Thomas made a welcome return to the Society to give us full 
information on the project to conserve and re-introduce the Large Blue. He has 
been in charge of the project since the beginning, and explained the reasons for 
the butterfly's decline, and its habitat requirements, and showed outstanding 
slides of every stage of its complex life-cycle. Dr. Mash talked about 
Dragonflies and Damselflies, and showed slides of species from Great Britain, 
Spain, Africa and Canada. The other two lectures covered migrant butterflies and 
moths in Britain, including the rarer Hawk -moths, and the life-cycles of some of 
the moths associated with hedgerows, and those of marshy areas, such as the Fen 
Wainscot (A. phragmitidis). 

My grateful thanks to all those members who support both the talks and the field 
meetings of this section. 

Margaret Brooks 
Chairman 



EXRACTS FROM THE ENTOMOLOGICAL HISTORY OF THE B.N.S.S. 

Throughout the years from its beginning up to the present day, the Bournemouth 
Natural Science Society has had the good fortune to be associated with a 
considerable number of people who have left their mark on the world of 
Entomology. Some have been - or still are - members of the Society; others have 
been connected with it either through donations to the museum collections or 
contributions to its publications. There follow a few biographical notes on some 
of these dedicated entomologists. 

The first of these - and one whose presence dominates the museum today - is 
George E.J. Crallan. Of Huguenot descent, he did have impressive ancestral 
connections- his paternal grandmother belonged to the Arden family - as did the 
mother of William Shakespeare. His profession was medicine. After studying at 
Emmanuel College, Cambridge he trained at Addenbrooke ' s Hospital, Cambridge and 
St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London, and after qualification he decided to 
specialize in Psychiatry. 

His interest in all aspects of Natural History led him to become a founder member 
of Bournemouth and District Society of Natural History in 1903, and he rose 
quickly to its highest office - that of President - a position which he occupied 
from 1904-06. A distinguished-looking man with a luxuriant moustache, he was very 
active in the Society's affairs. He gave lectures, served as Chairman of both the 
Astronomical and Physical sections, and as Chairman of Entomology from 1935-36. 
Another hobby was painting. He specialized in painting the eggs of butterflies 
and moths, and for many years framed examples of his considerable talent hung in 
the lecture hal 1 . 



- 41 - 



The museum received several donations from him, including a collection of exotic 
molluscs, but the one which is most familiar to members today is the collection 
of British Lepidoptera housed in two impressive cabinets at the eastern end of 
the room. He formed a very comprehensive collection of British butterflies and 
moths from all over the British Isles. Data labels indicate that although many 
were captured in the field, a great many others were bred. Breeding Lepidoptera 
is a specialised, time-consuming occupation, and one marvels at how he managed to 
find the time in between his work and other interests. The two 40-drawer cabinets 
are fashioned from oak. The larger of the two is elaborately carved and bears Dr. 
Crallan's initials worked into the design. An examination of the underside of 
drawer no. 40 reveals a fascinating episode in its construction. Written in ink 
on the base of the drawer are the words: "This drawer is the plan made by John 
Fowler the architect, builder and carver of this cabinet versus the design of 
G.E.J. Crallan and E.C. Rogers Esq. which all the other drawers are made from, 
and the said John Fowler believes it to be the best". The reader of this 
heartfelt statement can still sense the frustration and defiance of the writer - 
determined to make his point! The two cabinets were donated to the Society in 
1922. Dr Crallan passed away in January 1944 at Crowborough, Sussex at the aqe of 
92. 

Another of the Society's founder members whose name is familiar to all Dorset 
entomologists was W. Parkinson Curtis. A Dorset man, born in Poole, he lived for 
a time in Branksome Park, and finally in Parkstone. He worked in Bournemouth as a 
solicitor with the firm Trevanion, Curtis and Ridley, which later became Buchanan 
& Llewellyn, and it was he who in February 1906 drew up the agreement with Mr. 
Thick for the Society to rent a room for its headquarters above Thick's Boot Shop 
in Old Christchurch Road. He gave lectures to the Society, wrote entomological 
notes for the Proceedings, and was a contributor to the Society's publication of 
1914, "The Natural History of Bournemouth & District" for which he wrote the 
entomological section, and in conjunction with his brother Harker Curtis, the 
chapter on bird life. Also with his brother, he arranged and catalogued the 
Batley Collection of birds' eggs. It took them a year of working 3-4 hours a week 
to work through the 2000 eggs, and in recognition of this great effort the 
Society elected him an Honorary Member in 1922. 

Parkinson Curtis' entomological interest was centred solely on the Lepidoptera, 
and in his younger days he went on many field trips with some of the other Dorset 
entomological "greats" - Rev. D. Pickard-Cambridge, C.W. Dale and E.R. Bankes. As 
he approached middle age, increasing deafness made life difficult, and he was 
unable to attend the Society's meetings. His friend Eustace Bankes of Corfe 
Castle had spent many years compiling a comprehensive list of the Dorset 
Lepidoptera, but was unable to complete it due to a breakdown. The unfinished 
manuscript was given to Parkinson Curtis who worked hard to finish it, adding his 
own detailed records. The first two parts were published by the Society for 
British Entomology as "A list of the Lepidoptera of Dorset", but the final part 
unfortunately never progressed beyond manuscript form. He wrote many other papers 
and notes for various entomological journals, took up nature photography, 
including some early colour plate work, and specialised in the photomicrography 
of Microlepidoptera genitalia. A fine landscape painter in oils, he was also a 
very keen gardener, particularly interested in rhododendrons. He died on 26 June 
1968. 

Next, a look at two very notable entomologists who, though they were not members 
of the Society, did contribute to it. Miss Ethel K. Pearce, who became known for 
her work on Diptera (Flies). She, like Parkinson Curtis, contributed a chapter to 
the Society's "Natural History of Bournemouth & District" - an account of the 
Diptera, illustrated with photographs. She became an expert photographer, in fact 
she was one of the pioneers of pnotographic guides to insects. Her "Typical 
Flies, A Photographic Atlas of Diptera" was published by the Cambridge University 



- 42 - 



Press in 3 volumes between 1915 and 1928, and was highly acclaimed. In later life 
she lived at Morden with her brother, also a Dipterist and good field naturalist, 
and in 1932 the Entomologist's Monthly Magazine printed 2 articles by her - one 
on the technique of insect photography and another entitled "A Dipterous Oasis" 
about Morden Bog. She became very isolated in her later years; she became 
increasingly deaf, then lost her sight, and died in January 1940, a few months 
after the death of her brother. 

Lt. Col. Frederick C. Fraser was one of the world's leading authorities on the 
Dragonflies of the World. He studied medicine at Guy's Hospital, and after a few 
years in private practice he joined the Army and served in the Medical Corps in 
Mesopotamia during the Great War. He spent many years as Professor of Surgery at 
the Madras University Medical School, and on his retirement in 1933 came to live 
in Glenferness Avenue, Bournemouth. During his years in India he pursued his 
passion for dragonflies and butterflies, and wrote nearly 100 articles for the 
Proceedings of the Bombay Natural History Society. He also wrote 2 handbooks for 
the Royal Entomological Society - Handbook of Odonata, and Handbook of Mecoptera, 
Megaloptera and Neuroptera. 

He was an excellent field entomologist. In 1831 the great Dorset entomologist 
J.C. Dale, in the company of John Curtis from Norwich (author of the 16 volumes 
of "British Entomology") discovered on Parley Heath a species of dragonfly which 
he named Oxygastra curtisii in honour of his friend. This dragonfly - the Orange- 
spotted Emerald - was not seen in that locality after 1878, but Lt. Col. Fraser 's 
excellent field work uncovered it at the same site in 1925. A rather autocratic 
man who would appear stern at times, he was a talented entomological artist whose 
paintings illustrated many articles for the Bombay Natural History Society. His 
meticulous paintings of Microlepidoptera are exceptionally fine. He helped found 
the Society for British Entomology in 1934. His collection of dragonflies of the 
world went to the British Museum of Natural History, and his collection of 
Neuroptera and Allied Orders to the Hope Department of Entomology at Oxford, but 
in 1945 he presented a collection of British dragonflies to the Bournemouth 
Natural Science Society, and in 1952 he followed this with a drawer of 
Neuroptera. Both these presentations are now housed in 3 drawers of the Crallan 
cabinets. 

Professor G.D. Hale Carpenter was Professor of Entomology at Oxford, where he 
lived, specialising in the subject of mimicry and cryptic resemblance. He was 
adamant that cryptic resemblance was not the same thing as camouflage. In his 
view, "camouflage" indicated a conscious imitation of its surroundings by a 
creature, whereas "cryptic resemblance" was merely an evolutionary state which 
rendered protection. He also worked on the subject of butterflies being attacked 
by birds and other predators, assessing the frequency and area of attack, damage 
sustained by the victim, and rate of survival from such attacks. He was President 
of 'the Bournemouth Natural Science Society 1938-39, and his Presidential Address 
was "Mimicry in relation to other forms of Protective Coloration". 

A man who is remembered by many members is Sqd. Ldr. Courtenay Banks, known to 
his friends as "Monty". He began his flying career with the R.A.F. and then 
Imperial Airways, which later became B.O.A.C. During the second World War he re- 
joined the R.A.F. and served in the Middle East. Back with B.O.A.C. after the 
War, he was soon appointed Regional Director, first for West Africa, based in 
Lagos, then for the far East, based in Kuala Lumpur. These two appointments gave 
him a marvellous opportunity to pursue a lifelong passion for the'Lepidoptera, of 
which he formed a comprehensive collection. After his return from Malaya he lived 
for a time in a small village in Dorset, where his night-time activities with a 
Mercury vapour moth-trap caused great alarm amongst the villagers, who decided 
that he was practising witchcraft and sent the Vicar to speak to him! He joined 
the Society in 1967 and soon became Chairman of Entomology, a post which he held 
until his 

- 43 - 



death in 1982. He was President 1972-73, and his Presidential Address reflected 
another facet of his wide-ranging expertise; "A short history of Ancient, Old 
Antique and Antique Pile and Tapestry woven Oriental Textiles". In spite of 
severe leg injuries sustained during the War he was extremely active and 
energetic, and on many occasions members attending his field meetings were left 
gasping miles behind. Although his temperament could be explosive, he had a well- 
developed sense of humour, and was endlessly patient when explaining some aspect 
of his many interests, which included most branches of Natural History. Botany 
was a great favourite - he returned year after year to the mountains to 
photograph alpine flowers, and members enjoyed many talks about Ben Lawers, the 
Pyrenees and the Austrian Alps. His nature photography was outstanding, and after 
his death Mrs Banks presented to the Society a collection of his colour slides of 
Odonata, Alpine flowers of Ben Lawers, orchids, and butterflies. 

Entomology, however, was the subject in which he made his greatest contribution. 
He photographed virtually all the British dragonflies in their natural habitats, 
and decided to mount an exhaustive search for the Orange-spotted Emerald 
dragonfly (Oxygastra curtasii), not seen since 1964, to prove whether or not it 
was truly extinct in this country. An excellent field entomologist, he spent 
several seasons searching all the known localities for the insect, but without 
success, and was forced to conclude that the species had been lost from this 
area. Sqd. Ldr. Banks" most notable entomological successes were achieved during 
the 3 years he spent in Malaya, when most of his spare time was occupied by the 
study and collection of Lepidoptera. While moth-trapping at Maxwell's Hill he 
took a moth of the family Notodontidae which was new to science, and which was 
named after him - Phalera banksi. 

His most concerted effort concerned that beautiful butterfly with iridescent 
green feather-like markings on the velvety black forewings, the Swallowtail Rajah 
Brooke's Birdwing (Trogonoptera brookiana albescens). This butterfly is rather 
local in Malaya, and males are more often seen than females, which are much more 
secretive, difficult to find, and fly mainly round the treetops. At the time when 
Sqd. Ldr. Banks was in Malaya, the natural larval foodplant of this butterfly was 
unknown and an egg had never been found in the wild. With typical Banks 
determination he set out to remedy this situation. After 2 years of hard and 
fruitless work he saw a female T. brookiana fluttering round a climber on a tree 
in a forest clearing, and watched her lay a single egg on one of its leaves. With 
great effort, and using branches and vines to fashion a ladder he managed to 
reach the egg and photograph it. He took it back to his apartment where in due 
course it hatched. By then the supply of leaves he had collected had withered, 
and the botanists at the Botanical Gardens were unable to identify them beyond 
the fact that they belonged to some species of Aristolochia. He drove the 60 
miles back to the clearing and collected fresh leaves from the original plant, 
which the young larva then obstinately refused to eat. In desperation he scoured 
the area round Kuala Lumpur, collecting leaves from every species of Aristolochia 
he could find, and offered the selection to the starving infant, which eventually 
deigned to eat one particular species. The larva grew steadily, and when it was 
almost fully grown, Sqd. Ldr. Banks had to go away on a 3 day inspection tour. 
The cleaner who looked after his apartment was used to the succession of 
livestock which he reared, and promised to look after the precious larva. 
However, as soon as Sqd. Ldr. Banks had departed, the cleaner handed over his 
duties to a friend and went off to his village to attend a wedding. The relief 
worker arrived to tidy the apartment, saw a large caterpillar, and promptly 
sprayed it with "Flit". Sqd. Ldr. Banks returned to find the result of 2 years 
hard work lying dead on the floor of ics cage. 

At the present time, the Society is very fortunate to have as a member Mr S.C. 
Scarsdale Brown. He joined the Society in 1937, was Chairman of Entomology 1939- 
48. After a few years away from the Society, he rejoined in 1967 and was 



- 44 - 



President 1975-76, the subject of his Presidential Address being "The Natural 
History of Bournemouth 1800-1900". He edited the Proceedings from 1978-82 and is 
now an Honorary Member. He has lived all his life in the Bournemouth area, 
working as a Dental Practitioner. As a young man his interests centred on the 
Macrolepidoptera. He met W. Parkinson Curtis, who became a life-long friend, and 
joined the Society for British Entomology. There he met eminent entomologists 
such as Lt. Cdr. Fraser and William Fassnidge. The latter introduced him to the 
world of Microlepidoptera, at which he quickly became an expert, especially on 
the group of tiny moths known as Nepticulidae. Mr Brown was one of the 
contributors to the Illustrated Papers on British Microlepidoptera published in 
1978 by the British Entomological and Natural History Society, his paper being 
illustrated with the superb paintings of Lt. Col. Fraser. A meeting with Philip 
Harwood - one of the finest field entomologists - further added to his interests. 
Harwood concentrated on what are known to Lepidopteri sts as "Other Orders", i.e. 
groups such as Coleoptera (beetles), Hemiptera (bugs) and Hymenoptera (bees and 
wasps). Scarsdale Brown has studied all these groups, but has become one of the 
country's leading specialists in Aculeate and Parasitic Hymenoptera. His 
meticulous and painstaking fieldwork is illustrated by his work on the group of 
Parasitic Hymenoptera known as Fairy Flies (family Mymaridae). This contains what 
must be some of the world's smallest insects - one of the largest of the fairy 
flies has a wingspan of only 3mm; they pass their larval stages inside the eggs 
of other insects such as dragonflies. During the course of his study, he has 
recorded 7 species of Mymaridae new to Britain. His collection of specimens is a 
joy to behold - each fairy fly mounted in a microscope slide, and the tiny 
Nepticulid moths perfectly set. Mr Brown is an excellent artist in watercolour, 
and has contributed many notes to entomological magazines. Over the years the 
members of the Society have heard some fascinating lectures from him on 
Hymenoptera and other groups. In 1988 he received an award in the Manse 1-P leydel 1 
Prize Essay Competition. In recent years he has suffered from failing eyesight, 
which has prevented any of the entomological study he loves, but he still attends 
some lectures of the Society, and maintains his own garden, where he specialises 
in growing camellias and lilies. 

The fact that only one of the seven people mentioned above was a professional 
entomologist illustrates the valuable contributions to knowledge which can be 
provided by the dedicated, enthusiastic amateur. The Bournemouth Natural Science 
Society can be proud of its association with such notable people. 



Margaret Brooks 



ZOOLOGY - MAMMALIA 



Lectures 
1989 

November 



4 



Reptiles and Amphibians of Yugoslavia 



D.R. Bird 



1990 

January 
February 



22 
3 
3 
14 
25 
19 
9 
20 
19 



Sand Mammals 
Badgers 

Do Elephants Sing 

Safari Experiences among Animals 

Islands and Animal Life 

Primates 

Falklands Natural History 
Quiz - Natural History 
Christchurch Museum and Garden 



Miss K.M. Bennetts 
Martin Noble 



March 

March 

Apri 1 

May 

June 

June 

July 



Miss K.M. Bennetts 
Miss K.M. Bennetts 
Miss K.M^ Bennetts 
Miss K.M. Bennetts 
Sir Rex Hunt C.M.G. 
J.G. Parkinson 



Mrs G. Obee 



- 45 - 



Field Meetings 






1989 








October 


12 


South Oakley Inclosure 


Mrs M. Arnold 


October 


26 


Sika and other Deer 


Miss K.M. Bennetts 


November 


1 


Quiz - Natural History 


Miss K.M. Bennetts 


N ov embe r 


9 
C 


Berrywood Area 


Miss M.W.S. Davis 








My»c M ^ III nrl 
l Y lr i r 1 . o . LU Flu 


November 


23 


New Forest 


J.G. Parkinson 


December 


7 


Beau lieu Area 


J.G. Parkinson 


1990 








January 


11 


Hengistbury Area 


Mrs M. Arnold 


February 


1 


Brockenhurst Area 


Miss E. Souter 


February 


15 


Markway Inclosure Area 


Miss M.W.S. Davis 








Mrs M. Lund 


March 


1 


New Forest 


J.G. Parkinson 


March 


15 


Linford Area 


Mrs M. Arnold 


March 


22 


New Forest Natural History 


Martin Noble 


Apri 1 


6 


Brockenhurst Area 


Mrs M. Saunders 


Apri 1 


29 


Wimborne Area Natural History 


Miss N.L. Nicklen 








Mrs Crane 


May 


3 


Brockenhurst Area 


J.G. Parkinson 


May 


17 


Cadman"s Pool 


Mrs A. Leonard 


June 


7 


New Forest 


J.G. Parkinson 


August 


2 


Brockenhurst Area 


Miss E. Souter 








Miss E. Whatoff 


August 


23 


Hengistbury Head Natural History 


Mrs M. Saunders 


September 


13 


New Forest 


J.G. Parkinson 



In February Mr Martin Noble, Head Keeper, New Forest gave an informative lecture 
on Badgers. There are badger setts in the New Forest and other localities, which 
have been occupied on and off for many years, possibly hundreds and may continue 
to be used if left undisturbed. Badgers sometimes shift to new quarters half a 
mile or so away in summer. Later on the badgers or a different clan are likely to 
re-occupy the old sett. The tunnel systems of ancient setts may go down for many 
metres and may spread out for a distance of 25 metres. Although badgers are 
omnivorous, eating both animal and plant food, in Britain earthworms are by far 
the most important food source. However in the New Forest earthworms are in short 
supply and the acorns form an important additional food item. Badgers will dig in 
the ground for cockchafers, snails and other small prey. In the autumn berries 
and windfall apples are a supplementary diet. 

In November Mr D.R. Bird of Poole Aquarium gave a lecture on Reptiles and 
Amphibians of Yugoslavia. He visited, among other places, the National Park of 
Plitvice. The Park lies in a mountainous area with 16 lakes and a series of 
waterfalls and cascades. Heavy rain brought out huge numbers of Roman snails and 
large black slugs. The European salamander (Salamandra salamandra) was found on 
the edge of a stream and although the water was very cold a black specimen of the 
grass snake (Natrix natrix) was found swimming underwater among Bogbean plants. 
Also seen were Smooth Newt (Triturus vulgaris) and spectacular green lizards 
(Lacerta virides), the males had blue throats and were seen together with the 
Common Toad (Bufo bufo) basking in the sun in the woodland. Voles and Field Mice 
were climbing among bushes. A few Nose Horned Vipers (Vipera anmodyle), a wall 
lizard and a slow worm (Angris fragilis) with blue spots were in close proximity. 
Sand lizards sported among heather and Tree Frogs (Hyla arborea) were heard but 
not seen. It was interesting that Mr Bird should see amphibians and reptiles 
very similar to those in Britain. 

On October 26th a field meeting in the Sika Deer area was of exceptional interest 



- 46 - 



as the Camera Crew of 'Coast to Coast" television had asked to join the deer 
stalking members which were Miss K.M. Bennetts (Leader) Mesdames, 0. Draper, P. 
Andrews, H. Dickinson, N. Nic«len, R.Crane, Misses E. Souter, E. Whatoff, Messrs 
G. Parkinson and J. Andrews. Sightings of deer were disappointing but special 
features of terrain included passing places, wallows, fraying marks and 
differentiation in size and shape of slots (footprints) of the species of deer. 
It was a pouring wet 4 1/2 hour stalk, in spite of which the camera crew made 
excellent recordings, but as is sometimes the case the deer, chiefly sika, did 
not co-operate fully for one reason or another, However, members were thrilled to 
see themselves on television. Leaders and localities of the deer stalks are 
reported elsewhere in the Proceedings. The highest number on one occasion was 70, 
mostly Fallow Dama dama, bucks, does and juveniles, but no specification as to 
behaviour was witnessed. A natural history meeting in April at Pamphill near 
Wimborne produced fallow and roe (Capreolus capreolus) and a badger sett (Meles 
meles). The last stalk in September gave a mixed bag of large bucks, does and one 
fallow doe accompanied by her very small fawn, unusually so for the time of year. 

In March Mr Martin Noble escorted members on a walk in the New Forest to examine 
a newly excavated pond for wildlife, near Brownhills Inclosure. During this 
episode he talked at length on the habits of the Fallow deer (Dama dama), the 
behavioural pattern between bucks and does. During this discourse there were 
glimpses of 3 species of tits, Blue, Long tailed and Great, Tree Creepers and 
Nuthatch. A newly hatched speckled wood butterfly and a small tortoi seshe 1 1 , just 
out of hibernation interested us. The border of the New Forest and farmland in 
this area had not been disturbed for a number of years, but marl pits had formed. 
Marl is more alkaline than the usual acid soil of the New Forest. This was carted 
away to spread over sandy acid soils to improve their texture and fertility. 
Walking across Marlborough Deep it was interesting to watch two brook - lampreys 
(lampetra planeri) excavating a shallow hollow in the gravel bed of a small 
stream by vigorous sideways waving movements of their eel-like bodies. Later the 
female would lay up to 1,200 eggs in this nest. We were also shown four species 
of newt, Triturus vulgaris (smooth) Triturus helveticus (palmate) and 
Triturus cri status (Great crested). 

On August 23rd the Hengistbury Area was the venue. From the starting point at the 
Saxon King the walk continued beyond the school and then to the North of the golf 
course reaching to the Old Wick Lane track along which White Poplar, Tamarisk and 
Buddleia had been planted as a shelter belt. Birds seen were Goldfinch, 
Wheatears, Linnet, Spotted Flycatchers and Redstart. Butterflies spotted were 
Grayling, Painted lady, Holly Blue, and Meadow Brown. A stop was made at the 
Rangers Office to read the Wildlife Information. The walk progressed seawards 
along Double Dykes to examine the Coast Protection and note the very rapid 
erosion over the Head that had taken place during the last 150 years since the 
removal of the Iron Stone 'Doggers*. The tide was high and as a precaution a 
pre-col lection of shells from the beach had been made and was now set out for 
identification. Striped Venus Striatula (Venus striatula), Prickley Cockle 
(Cardium echineda), Grooved Razor (Solen marginatus), Common otter (Lutraria 
lutraria), Common Limpet (Patella vulgaris), Thin Tellin (Tellin tenuim), 
Variegated scallop (Chlamys varia) and Banded Carpet (Vemerupis saxatilis). After 
a ten minute break, the walk followed the footpath to the Batters overlooking 
the old nursery. This path has recently been cleaned revealing the regrowth of 
Gantheria Shellon. The lilies on the Lily ponds were at their most beautiful. 
The following dragonflies and damselflies were seen, Alshna Cyamea, Sympetnum 
Striolatium, Ischnure elegans, Calonteryx vergo and Cerrogrion' tenel lim. The 
walk continued in an eastward direction towards the top of Warren Hill near the 
Palaeolithic site of 11,000 years ago, where Reindeer Hunters came from the rest 
of Europe (no English Channel then) after the last Ice Age. Finally along the 
water's edge we noted the following flora - Sea Rocket, Sea Aster, Sea Lavender, 
Sea Arrow Grass, Common Orache and Bur Marigold. 



- 47 - 



In June Sir Rex Hunt, former Governor of the Falklands gave an illuminating 
account of the Islands, illustrated by excellent slides, chiefly on wildlife. 
The Islands lie west of Argentina, about 350 miles from the nearest point of 
South America and occupy 4700 sq. miles in entirety. There are two main islands, 
East and West Falkland separated by the Falkland Sound, besides which there are 
approximately 200 smaller islands. Stanley is the capital with an approximate 
population of 1800 people. On the Islands the number of sheep far exceeds that of 
the people, many of whom are reliant upon their valuable wool yield. Animal life 
is varied and numerous with many different habitats - sea, cliffs, sandy and 
rocky beaches, pools and lakes, to meet the needs of food, nests and breeding. I 
will endeavour to name as many as space will allow. 

There are 5 species of penguins, the commonest ones being Rockhoppers, Magellan 
or Jack Ass so called because of its ass-like call, and Gentoos. The Magellans 
build their nests deep underground which gives their eggs greater protection from 
marauding skuas and gulls. They have most distinctive plumage on head and neck, 
black and white markings. The Gentoos are found in huge concentrations in and 
around the islands up to three miles from the beach, along which they wander 
regimental -fashion studying any dark object in the water which may prove to be a 
shark, before entering the sea. King penguins are rare and Macaroni associates 
with colonies of Rockhoppers. 

There are many pools, fresh water, and lakes to provide necessary water for 
drinking and bathing to help clean their feathers of salt water. These ponds are 
frequented by Flightless and Flying Steamer ducks, Crested Patagonian Duck, 
Silver Grebe, Dotterel, White Rumped Sandpipers and Kelp Goose. The Upland Goose 
is unpopular with farmers because of its damage to young re-sown grass, but 
popular as making a relief of diet from 365 day mutton! Sandy and rocky beaches 
are frequented by Rock and King Shags and belts of tussock grass up to a height 
of 10ft often provide cover for Sealions, Fur and Elephant Seals. The latter is 
the largest seal with a body length up to 17ft. The name elephant is accounted 
for by its elephant-like proboscis which during the rut can be inflated to 
several feet and curves into its mouth and has the function of serving as a 
resonator to increase the volume of the bulls' rutting roar. The attractive 
Black-browed Albatross, common on many islands, is seen nesting on clay-like 1ft 
high pedestals to brood the single egg by each parent in turn. Predatory birds 
such as Turkey Vulture are seen in Mt William area. Caracara or Johnny Rook, Gt. 
Skua and Giant Petrel, both habitual egg and chick stealers, also stalk penguin 
rookeries . 

Sir Rex did not neglect the smaller birds of open heath and mentioned the Grass 
Wren, typical of wrens world wide, Military starling or Meadow lark, with 
startling red breast, and the Falkland Thrush, resembling the female British 
Blackbird. He named many more avian and mammalian fauna, unfortunately too many 
to enumerate in this report. 

He also spoke of the Cathedral, not yet 100 years old but in dire need of 
expensive repairs, no doubt the exigencies of war were partly responsible. He 
told his audience that the Duchess of York was interested in the Cathedral's 
funding. Sir Rex earned loud applause for the quality of his lecture and it is 
hoped he will make a return visit. 

In concluding this report I wish to record my thanks to members, who at short 
notice, stood in for me to complete my scheduled programme. I also wish to thank 
Mr Graham Wilson and his colleagues for projecting my slides. 

K. Milner Bennetts 
Chairman 



- 48 - 



ZOOLOGY - ORNITHOLOGY 



Lectures 








1990 








January 


27 


Birds can be a nuisance 


John Elgood, M.A. 


March 


28 


The Kingfisher 


D.A. Boag 


July 


23 


Bird Recognition 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


September 


22 


Two R.S .P.B. Films 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


Field Meetings 






1989 








October 


10 


Radipole Lake and Lodmoor 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


October 


24 


Stanpit Marshes 


J.G. Parkinson 


November 


9 


Shipstal Point, Arne 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


November 


24 


Beaulieu Road 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


December 


8 


Titchfield Haven Nature Reserve 


Miss G . Hayba 1 1 


December 


12 


South Haven Peninsula 


J.G. Parkinson 


1990 








January 


5 


Ripley Village and Sop ley 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


January 


23 


Farlington Marshes (Cancelled due 


to storms) Mrs L.M. Maddox 


February 


2 


Badbury Rings 


Mrs J. Butt 


February 


20 


Cal shot 


J.G. Parkinson 


March 


6 


Upton Country Park 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


March 


23 


Keyhaven Marshes 


J.G. Parkinson 


Apri 1 


5 


Stanpit Marshes 


J.G. Parkinson 


Apri 1 


27 


Durlston Head 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


May 


10 


Martin Down 


Mrs M. Saunders 


May 


25 


Win spit 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


June 


1 


Sherford Bridge for Nightjars 


John Lockwood and 








Mrs M. Evelyn 


June 


5 


Beaulieu Road 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


June 


21 


Abbot's Well 


Mrs J. Butt 


July 


10 


Little Wootton Inclosure 


Mrs M. Saunders 


July 


17 


Morning walk on Talbot Heath 


Mrs M. Evelyn 


August 


3 


Kingston Common 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


August 


15 


Stanpit Marshes 


J.G. Parkinson 


August 


30 


Keyhaven Marshes 


J.G. Parkinson 


September 


11 


Ninebarrow Down 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


September 


18 


Durlston Head 


Mrs L.M. Maddox 


September 


28 


Oberwater 


J.G. Parkinson 



Once again our first Field Meeting for the period of this Report was to Radipole 
Lake and Lodmoor near Weymouth on 10th October. The area of mud at Radipole was 
small on this occasion as the water level was unusually high, so that such waders 
- Greenshank, Godwit, Snipe etc, that we saw were on the marsh at Lodmoor, 
although we did find Bearded Tits amongst the reeds at Radipole. Little Egret 
and Spoonbill were in Poole Harbour during the winter and we saw both from the 
hide at Shipstal Point, Arne on 9th November. 

With two mild winters in succession the Dartford Warbler is doing 'well and we had 
excellent views of two pairs on the moorland at Beaulieu Road in November on a 
fine and sunny day. Miss Gwen Hayball led a party to Titchfield Haven Nature 
Reserve on 8th December and we were taken to 4 hides overlooking the marsh where 
we had splendid views of a Kingfisher and an uncommon little bird - the 
Firecrest, which was wintering there in the trees. We saw little Egret and 



- 49 - 



Spoonbill again in Poole Harbour near the South Haven Peninsula on 12th December 
and they were joined by an Avocet also wintering there. 

In late January came the hurricane type winds which swept Britain causing so much 
damage. We ventured to Badbury Rings on 2nd February to find many of the beeches 
down, but saw a Brambling flying round one of the fallen trees. 

A new venue for this Section was Upton Park which has a large hide overlooking 
the back of Poole Harbour. We noticed a flock of Redwing on the grass and a big 
flock of Black Tailed Godwit on the mud of the harbour. This was in early March. 
Our first Wheatear of the spring appeared at Keyhaven on 23rd March and by 27th 
April on a fine sunny day at Durlston there were Garden Warblers, Whitethroat, 
Chiffchaff, Common Tern, a Cuckoo and Swallow and Sand Martins on the downs. We 
were again fortunate at Martin Down. On 10th May we listened to 4 Nightingales, 
all singing together apparently in competition for territory. 

Mr John Lockwood met us again at Sherford Bridge on 1st June at 9 p.m. and our 
small party heard and saw a number of Nightjars displaying in the plantation on a 
fine still evening. Mrs Margaret Evelyn once more took a morning meeting over 
Bourne Bottom on Talbot Heath in July. Unfortunately although there are several 
pairs of Dartford Warblers nesting there we did not see or hear any that day 
possibly due to the very hot and dry weather which had started by then. 

Whimbrel and Little Stint were on Stanpit Marsh on 16th August and Yellow Wagtail 
and Wheatear were gathering for migration. Our meeting at Keyhaven on 30th August 
was memorable for the sight of a Hobby hunting over the marshes and a Curlew 
Sandpiper in one of the pools. 

An otherwise rather unproductive Field Day at Durlston Country Park on September 
18th. ended splendidly with the sight of 2 Peregrine Falcons, a hen and tiercel, 
hunting along the cliffs at the same time as a Gannet appeared fishing out at 
sea. The final meeting of this season at Oberwater in the New Forest gave us the 
rare spectacle of a Honey Buzzard soaring over our heads. 

John Elgood treated us to an interesting and thought provoking lecture in January 
on "Birds can be a nuisance" and in March Mr D.A. Boag brought his splendid 
slides and talked to us about the Kingfisher. 

We had an informal meeting in the Museum in July on Bird Recognition, and two 
excellent R.S.P.B. films at the end of September. 

We do welcome new Members to our Field Meetings and I am so grateful to all 
Members who have helped me by leading Field Meetings and generally supporting 
this section. 

L.M. Maddox 
Chairman 



- 50 - 



Local Record List of Birds of Particular Interest 



Gannet (Sula bassana) 18 September, Durlston 

Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) 9 November, Shipstal Pt. Arne 

12 December, S. Haven Peninsula and 30 August, Keyhaven 

Spoonbill - 2 (Platalea leucordia) 9 November, Shipstal Pt. Arne 

Honey Buzzard (Pernis apirorus) 28 September, Oberwater 

Hobby (Falco subbuteo) 30 August, Keyhaven 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) 27 April and 18 September (pr) Durlston 

Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) 16 August, Stanpit 

Common Sandpiper (Tringa hypoleucos) 17 July, Bourne Bottom 

Little Stint (Calidris minuta) 16 August, Stanpit 

Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris testacea) 30 August, Keyhaven 

Ruff (Phi lomacus pugnax) 8 December, Titchfield 

Avocet (Recurvi rostra avosetta) 12 December, S. Haven Peninsula 

Nightjar (Caprimulgus europaeus) 1 June, Sherford Bridge 

Nightingale - 4 (Luscinia megarhynchos ) 10 May, Martin Down 

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos minor) 28 September, Oberwater 

Dartford Warbler (Sylvia undata) 24 November, Beaulieu Road 

Wood Warbler (Phyl loscopus sibilatrix) 5 June, Beaulieu Road 

Firescrest (Regulus ignicapillus) 8 December, Titchfield 

Spotted Flycatcher (Muscicapa striata) 11 September, Ninebarrow Down 

Water Pipit (Anthus spinoletta) 23 March, Keyhaven 

Brambling (Fringilla montifringilla) 2 February, Badbury Rings 



- 51 - 



MEMBERS DAY 



1989 








October 


4 


Slides from Gal loway 


T.P. Whieldon B.Sc. 


November 


15 


Feathers, Flowers and Foliage 


W.J. Whitsed F.R.S.A 


December 


6 


Poetry Readings 


Members 


1990 








January 


17 


New Members 1 Day 


The President 


February 


12 


Thoughts about Furniture 


Members 


March 


7 


From Burg to Berg. A look at 








West Germany 


J. Andrews 


Apri 1 


23 


Quiz 


Members 


May 


30 


Members" Slides 


Mrs G. Obee 


June 


27 


Round the Garden at No. 39 


Miss Blower 


Ju ly 


25 


Poetry Readings 


Members 


August 


15 


Glass and Glassware 


Members 


September 


10 


Talks by Members on books which have 








interested them 


Members 



Twelve new members were welcomed in January and old and new members were shown 
around the garden in June. 

The excellent slide shows by Mr Whieldon, Mr Whitsed and Mr Andrews taught us 
about Galloway, some aspects of Natural History and Germany. In my absence Mrs 
Obee chaired the Members' slide afternoon in May. 

Members enjoyed the informal atmosphere of the poetry and books afternoons and 
also of the furniture and glass ones when after short talks by the Chairman they 
were able to show and talk about their possessions. The April quiz was on the 
names of rivers. 

My thanks are due to all who have taken part, space does not allow of individual 
mention . 

H.M. Dickinson 
Chairman 

LIBRARY 

Eight new books were purchased and added to our collection during the past year 
and 43 donated books have also enlarged our Lending Section. All these donations 
and other publications passed on to the Society are greatly appreciated. 

Work has continued with the repair of books from the Reference Library plus 
refurbishment of "Sowerby's" English Botany collection of 12 volumes. These were 
in particularly bad condition with loose pages and plates but are now in a usable 
condition and the repairs have of course greatly increased their value. 

Once again, as Hon. Librarian, I wish to express my personal thanks to all the 
voluntary helpers and members of the Library Committee who between them continue 
to keep the Library available to Members. 

John Ruston, a life member of the Society since 1970, died on 9th March. One of 
England's most formidable antiquarian booksellers, he took over Commins, the 
bookshop that was in Old Christchurch Road, in 1954 until his retirement in 1981. 
He re-valued the books in the Society's library for insurance and was 
instrumental in the renovation of books that were deteriorating in the reference 
library. 

R.E. Harwood Hon. Librarian 

- 52 - 



MUSEUM 

This has been a particularly active year for the Museum Committee, with many plans 
under consideration for the restoration and conservation of important items, and 
plans for the future include the re-siting of various archaeology and history 
col lections. 

Among the new members welcomed to the Committee during the year have been the 
Revd. F.W. King, the new Chairman of Physics and Chemistry, and Mr Tony Westrap as 
deputy Chairman of Archaeology and History, and their reports appear elsewhere in 
these Proceedings. Also Mr Bob George (no relation to the Chairman of the Museum 
Committee) whose interest in Siphonaptera (fleas) was demonstrated at the Open Day 
in September. Mr George is a specialist in his particular field, and is in much 
demand national ly. 

For the Open Day in September, it had been decided to change the day from Saturday 
to Wednesday, to change the location of some of the exhibits and to increase the 
number of directional notices to help our visitors. Such was its success that it 
has been proposed to repeat these arrangements next year. 

The Museum Registration Scheme introduced by the Area Museum Council for the South 
West (AMCSW) has been discussed and is reported elsewhere in the Proceedings. Our 
membership of the AMCSW has brought its benefits; the Geology Collection has been 
the subject of a Special Report from the AMCSW, as has the Heywood Sumner Frieze 
from the Archaeology Room, currently being examined prior to treatment by the Area 
Council in Bristol. Because of our membership of the AMCSW, we were invited to 
attend the Autumn Meeting of the South Western Federation of Museums and Art 
Galleries in October. About 80 members from all over the South-West were present, 
making possible useful contacts, and the meeting included a tour of the railway 
museum at Swindon and a visit to the Transport Collection at Wroughton, the 
outstation of the Science Museum, which was opened especially for the occasion. 

During the year, Museum Committee members have attended regional meetings of the 
Dorset Museums Association (DMA), thus taking the opportunity of visiting small 
community museums at Lyme Regis, Blandford, Wareham etc., and taking advantage of 
the excellent talks given on each occasion. Following a very successful evening 
picnic at the Red House Museum, Christchurch, in June, in spite of heavy rain, a 
similar event is to be held here on the evening of the 7th June 1991, creating a 
social occasion when members of the DMA can meet some of our members and perhaps 
be taken round our premises. 

Mr Tom Craig, the new DMA Museums Advisor for Dorset, has already visited us and 
we look forward to our further association with him. 

Jessie George 
Chairman 



- 53 - 



PUBLICATIONS AND PERIODICALS RECEIVED 

The following publications were received in the Library during the year. Some of 
them were gifts from members who subscribe personally to the particular Society. 
The Library Committee are glad to record their appreciation of such gifts. 



Alpine Garden Society Bulletin 

Birmingham Natural History and Philosophical Society - Proceedi ngs 

Botanical Society of the British Isles - Watsonia. Proceedings 

Bristol Naturalists' Society - Proceedi ngs 

California Academy of Sciences - Proceedings 

Cambridge Antiquarian Society - Proceedings 

Council for British Archaeology - Newsletter 

Dorset Trust for Nature Conservation - Newsletter 

Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society - Proceedings 

Geology Today 

Hampshire Field Club and Archaeological Society - Proceedi ng s 

Hertford Natural History Society - Transactions " — 

National Geographic Magazine 

National Trust - Newsletter 

Nature 

Oryx 

Royal Horticulture Society - "Gardens" . 

Senckenberg ische Naturf orschende Gesellschaft - "Natur und Museum" 
Societe Jersaise - Annual Bulletin 

Torquay Natural History Society - Transactions and Proceedings 
Upsala University, Sweden - Acta Phytogeograph ica 1 Suecica 
Zoological Society of London. 



- 54 - 



LIST OF PRESIDENTS (1903 - 1990) 



1903- 04 J.E.Beale (Mayor of Bournemouth) 

1904- 06 G.E.J.Crallan, MA, M.B., M.R.C.S. 

1906- 07 H.J.Waddington, F.LS. 

1907- 09 A.Ransome, MA, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R.S. 

1909- 10 A.Smith Woodward, D.Sc, F.R.S., F.L.S., P.G.S. 

1910- 11 Dukinfield H.Scott, M.A., LI.D., F.R.S., F.L.S., F.G.S. 

1911- 13 Sir E.Ray Lankester, K.C.B., MA, LI.D., F.R.S., F.LS. 
1913-16 Sir Daniel Morris, K.C.M.G., J. P., MA, D.Sc, D.C.L, F.L.S. 

1916- 17 The Rt.Hon. the Earl of Malmesbury, D.L, J,P. 

1917- 18 Sir Jethro J.H.Teale, MA, D.Sc, LI.D., F.R.S. 

1918- 20 Field Marshall Lord Grenfell of Kilvey, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., LI.D., F.SA 

1920- 21 Lt.Col. Sir David Pram, C.M.G., CLE., F.R.S. 

1921- 23 F.G.Penrose, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.Z.S., M.B.O.U. 

1923- 24 Sir F.W.Keeble, K.B.E., D.Sc, F.R.S. 

1924- 26 Hubert Painter, B.Sc, F.C.S. 
1926-28 Heywood Sumner, F.SA. 

1928- 29 Claude Lyon 

1929- 30 Professor F.O.Bower, D.Sc, F.R.S. 

1930- 31 Henry Bury, MA, F.LS., F.G.S. 

1931- 32 Dukinfield H.Scott, MA, LI.D., F.R.S., F.L.S., F.G.S. 

1932- 33 J.P.Williams-Freeman, M.D. 

1933- 34 Rev.F.C.R.Jourdain, MA, F.Z.S., M.B.O.U. 

1934- 35 Sir F.W.Dyson, K.B.E., MA., D.Sc, LI.D., F.R.S., F.R.A.S. 

1935- 36 Henry Bury, M.A., F.L.S., F.G.S. 

1936- 37 Sir Harold Carpenter, MA, D.Sc, F.R.S. 

1937- 38 Professor John Cameron, M.D., D.Sc, F.R.S.E. 

1938- 39 Professor G.D.Hale Carpenter, M.B.E., D.M., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.R.E.S. 

1939- 40 W.G.Aitchison Robertson, M.D., D.Sc, F.R.C.P., F.R.S.E. 

1940- 41 Rev.Professor M.C.Potter, MA, D.Sc, F.L.S. 

1941- 42 Inst.-Capt.M.A.Ainslie, R.N., MA, F.R.A.S. 

1942- 43 William C.Simmons, B,Sc, A.R.C.S., F.G.S. 

1943- 44 Professor S.Mangham, M.A. 

1944- 45 A.S.Hemmy, B.A., M.Sc 

1945- 46 J.F.N.Green, BA, F.G.S. 

1946- 47 Lt.-Col.CD.Drew, D.S.O., F.SA. 

1947- 48 W.J.Woodhouse, A.C.P. 

1948- 49 Edward Hindle, M.A., D.Sc, F.R.S., F.Z.S. 

1949- 50 Mrs.W.Boyd Watt, F.Z.S., M.B.O.U. 

1950- 51 Professor Sir RAPeters, M.C, MA, M.D., F.R.S. 

1951- 52 Ernest Chambers, F.L.S. 

1952- 53 F.Williamson, F.R.Hist.S. 



55 



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iviioo ivi . ivi . di uu r\o, rii.w., ivi.it. riidiiiio., r.n.o.n., i .m.l.o. 


1 QR1 -R? 

I c?o I Oc. 


ivi I o.ivi.rx.rdi Ml loUl I 


1 QRP-ft^ 


N^icc W Milnor Ronnottc F ~~7 Q 

IVIloo fx-. IVI Ml Id Dd II ItJllO, i .Z-.O. 


1 QR^-R4 

I JOO OH 


Mice M W 9 Davie: 

IVIloo IVI. VV .O.LJd Vlo 


1QR4-RS 


R F Harricnn F M A 
n.r .ndi I loUl I, i.ivi.m. 


19RS-8B 

1 ^ U O U VJ 


Misc; RHD Wintpr 

IVIIOO 1 i.l I.U. VV II ILv^l 


19RR-R7 

I C70U O / 


IPParkincnn F79 


1 QQ7-QQ 
1 1 OO 


iviioo ivi. oiocKer, d.m. 


1988-89 


Mrs Jessie George 


1989-90 


MP. Bentley O.B.E., C.Eng 


1990-91 


TP. Whieldon B.Sc. 



56 



Printed by Sinclair Print, 396 Ashley Road, Parkstone, Poole, Dorset 



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